T/personal-finance

  1. Dad, a Death Sentence and the Planner Who Set Us Straight Business, Yesterday

    A personal finance columnist, a lawyer and an executive whose nonprofit works with cancer patients sound like siblings who would be prepared to deal with their dad’s diagnosis. They still needed help.

  2. Home Buyers, Beware: ‘Views Are Not Guaranteed’ Business, Yesterday

    All kinds of things can go wrong, especially if you’re buying in an area you’re not familiar with. The advice from experts: Do your homework.

  3. Disabled Recipients of Stimulus Aid Are Urged to Save Some in Special Accounts Business, Yesterday

    Advocates for tax-favored ABLE accounts have spread the word about the benefit of putting at least part of the pandemic relief check in one.

  4. Raising Money for a Nonprofit? Try a Personalized Approach Business, February 19

    A new report found that small changes by gift officers — like getting to know the donor — could reap big benefits for their organizations.

  5. More Consumers Complain About Errors on Their Credit Reports Business, February 19

    Complaints doubled last year, federal data shows. Some problems may be related to pauses in mortgage and student loan payments in the pandemic.

  6. The Question Some Company Owners Don’t Want to Deal With Business, February 12

    Tales from two sons whose fathers died without a succession plan.

  7. ¿Tengo que pagar impuestos por el cheque de estímulo? Y otras dudas tributarias en Español, February 12

    La temporada de declaración de impuestos está a punto de comenzar; esto es lo que tienes que saber.

  8. Is My Stimulus Payment Taxable? And Other Tax Questions Business, February 11

    With tax filing season about to begin, here’s what you need to know.

  9. In ‘Do-Over,’ Enrollment in Affordable Care Act Health Insurance Reopens Business, February 5

    The new three-month sign-up period begins Feb. 15, as millions of people have lost their jobs and insurance in the pandemic.

  10. A Bigger Risk Than GameStop? Beware the Ponzi Scheme Next Door Business, February 5

    Experts have seen an increase in the frauds, many of which are preying on investors who feel they lost out on the market gains of the last few years.

  11. How a Fintech Exec Who Focuses on Poverty Relief Spends Sundays Metropolitan, February 5

    The pandemic has been a challenge for Wemimo Abbey, whose company serves low-income communities.

  12. How to Win at the Stock Market by Being Lazy Upshot, February 4

    The drama of GameStop is misleading; the surer path to wealth is extremely boring.

  13. An Invisible Cost of College: Parental Guilt Well, February 3

    Is it any wonder that plenty of people are tempted to borrow a whole lot of money to send their kids to college?

  14. A 10-Year-Old GameStop Investor Cashed In. His Return? Over 5,000%. Express, January 30

    Jaydyn Carr of San Antonio made $3,200 on shares from GameStop this week that his mother bought him in 2019 for about $60.

  15. So You Just Made a Lot of Money on GameStop. There’s One Catch: Taxes Business, January 30

    Some investors may have notched tens of thousands of dollars in profits. Depending on when they sell the stock, they may owe hefty capital gains taxes.

  16. Reader’s Guide: Everything You Need to Know About the GameStop Frenzy Business, January 30

    Amateur investors, in a battle with hedge funds, bid up shares in a number of companies, including GameStop, which gained 400 percent for the week.

  17. As Bitcoin’s Price Surges, Affluent Investors Start to Take a Look Business, January 29

    Cryptocurrencies, originally a way to conduct business outside the financial system, are increasingly seen as an asset akin to private equity or venture capital.

  18. Changes in FAFSA May Reduce College Aid for Some Families Business, January 29

    A new formula will no longer offer a break to many parents who have multiple children in college at the same time, experts say.