T/technology

  1. After Social Media Bans, Militant Groups Found Ways to Remain Technology, Today

    Hezbollah and other groups classified as terrorist organizations by the United States have changed their social media strategies to stay on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter.

  2. The Real Stars of the Internet Style, Today

    The rater has become the rated.

  3. Uber’s Self-Driving Cars Are Valued at $7.25 Billion by Investors Technology, Yesterday

    A billion-dollar investment is meant to prop up a money-losing unit before Uber makes its pitches ahead of a planned I.P.O.

  4. Amazon Gives Up on Chinese Domestic Shopping Business Technology, Yesterday

    The company had long struggled to gain traction in China despite operating there for more than a decade.

  5. How to Declutter and Speed Up Your Phone Smarter Living, Yesterday

    If your phone is feeling a little laggy, here are some tips to clear out old apps and other things that may be slowing it down.

  6. Samsung’s Review Phones Fail, Delivering a P.R. Nightmare Technology, Yesterday

    The company said some of the problems described in reviews of its nearly $2,000 Galaxy Fold phone might be due to the removal of a protective film from the display.

  7. Here’s Soylent’s New Product. It’s Food. Style, Yesterday

    The Silicon Valley food-drink of choice is now a ‘complete nutrition platform.’ The beverage plot thickens.

  8. I.P.O. Day for Pinterest and Zoom Ends With Shares Sharply Higher Technology, Yesterday

    Coming into these I.P.O.s, there were many questions about whether investors were willing to swallow the risk of the latest crop of tech companies.

  9. Pinterest Prices I.P.O. at $19 a Share, for a $12.7 Billion Valuation Technology, April 17

    The shares will begin trading Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol PINS.

  10. Why You Can No Longer Get Lost in the Crowd Opinion, April 17

    Once, it was easy to be obscure. Technology has ended that.

  11. India Halts Downloads of TikTok Video App, Citing Harm to Children Business, April 17

    TikTok is popular with children and young adults worldwide, but regulators are scrutinizing it, citing concerns about misuse and privacy.

  12. The Must-Have When Reporting on Disasters: A Satellite Phone Technology, April 17

    Thomas Fuller, San Francisco bureau chief, knows you cannot rely on cell networks during earthquakes, wildfires and other breaking news catastrophes.

  13. Uber vs. Lyft: Which Ride-Hailing App Is Better? Technology, April 17

    Here’s a comprehensive comparison of the two services to help you choose your go-to app for hitching rides.

  14. Uber vs. Lyft: Which Ride-Hailing App Is Better? Technology, April 17

    Here’s a comprehensive comparison of the two services to help you choose your go-to app for hitching rides.

  15. Apple and Qualcomm Settle All Disputes Worldwide Technology, April 16

    Apple and Qualcomm said they had agreed to dismiss all litigation between them worldwide.

  16. Privacy Is Too Big to Understand Opinion, April 16

    At its heart, privacy is about how data is used to take away our control.

  17. YouTube Fact-Checks the Fire at Notre-Dame With Facts About ... 9/11 Technology, April 16

    The company said that a misguided algorithm paired live footage of the blaze in Paris with information about the 2001 terrorist attacks.

  18. How to Make Friends While Traveling Solo Travel, April 16

    Even in the best cases, traveling alone can get lonely. Here’s how to connect safely with the people you meet along the way.

  19. Who Goes Public When? Tech Companies Maneuver to Stand Out in the Horde Technology, April 15

    With so many start-ups listing their shares this year, each is trying to avoid the traffic jam to get its own moment in the sun.

  20. Big Companies Thought Insurance Covered a Cyberattack. They May Be Wrong. Technology, April 15

    Citing a rarely used ‘war exemption,’ insurers say they aren’t responsible for the 2017 NotPetya attack.

  21. One Month, 500,000 Face Scans: How China Is Using A.I. to Profile a Minority Technology, April 14

    In a major ethical leap for the tech world, Chinese start-ups have built algorithms that the government uses to track members of a largely Muslim minority group.

  22. The Only Answer Is Less Internet Opinion, April 13

    Our emerging post-privacy order isn’t quite totalitarian, but it’s getting there.

  23. Apple and Qualcomm’s Global Fight Heads to Court in San Diego Technology, April 13

    The battle between the companies, once partners, could affect the division of billions of dollars in smartphone profits and, perhaps, how much consumers pay for phones.

  24. The Infinite Scroll Opinion, April 13

    Life under the unbreakable lure of the screen.

  25. Google’s Sensorvault Is a Boon for Law Enforcement. This Is How It Works. Technology, April 13

    Investigators have been tapping into the tech giant’s enormous cache of location information in an effort to solve crimes. Here’s what this database is and what it does.

  26. Tracking Phones, Google Is a Dragnet for the Police Interactive, April 13

    The tech giant records people’s locations worldwide. Now, investigators are using it to find suspects and witnesses near crimes, running the risk of snaring the innocent.

  27. Jet Airways, a Pioneer in India’s Skies, May Stop Flying Technology, April 12

    India’s second-largest airline is out of cash and operating just nine planes. The outlook for a rescue is grim.

  28. Facebook Is Stealing Your Family’s Joy Opinion, April 12

    Before you post that baby bump or college acceptance letter online, remember how much fun it used to be to share in person.

  29. Checking on Social Security Estimates Is a Good Idea, but Many People Don’t Do It Your Money, April 12

    The Social Security Administration used to mail out many more statements each year. Now, it encourages workers to go online. A new report says millions haven’t looked.

  30. The Week in Tech: We Might Be Regulating the Web Too Fast Technology, April 12

    Conflicting national laws on harmful content could have unintended consequences for the global internet.

  31. These Funds Rode Small Companies to Big Returns Business, April 12

    Three top-performing funds each racked up returns of more than 25 percent, helped by bets on small- and mid-cap growth stocks.

  32. He Has Driven for Uber Since 2012. He Makes About $40,000 a Year. Technology, April 12

    Peter Ashlock has completed 25,000 trips for Uber. As insiders cash in with what may be a $100 billion public offering, he’s on the road to nowhere.

  33. What Exactly Is Uber’s ‘Core Platform Contribution Margin’? Technology, April 11

    Uber, like many other tech companies, is using a few creative terms to describe its business. We’ll try to translate them for you.

  34. ‘Curious Eyes Never Run Dry’ Opinion, April 11

    The government charged Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks, not with publishing classified government information, but with stealing it, skirting — for now — critical First Amendment questions.

  35. Uber, Losing $1.8 Billion a Year, Reveals I.P.O. Filing Technology, April 11

    The world’s largest ride-hailing service unveiled its prospectus for what is likely to be the biggest initial public offering for years.

  36. It's Time to Panic About Who’s Watching Us Opinion, April 11

    We have no privacy online.

  37. It’s Time to Delete Your Tweets. It’s Not That Easy. Style, April 11

    Twitter borrows most of its best ideas from users. Except the idea to set our feeds on fire.

  38. How The Times Thinks About Privacy Opinion, April 10

    We’re examining our policies and practices around data, too.

  39. We’re Not Going to Take It Anymore Opinion, April 10

    We’ve given up too much control over our digital lives. We need a law to take some of it back.

  40. I Don’t Care. I Love My Phone. Opinion, April 10

    Sure, electronic eyes are spying. But look at everything this pocket computer can do!

  41. Feeling Safe in the Surveillance State Opinion, April 10

    In China, where facial recognition cameras are celebrated as a national triumph, many citizens convince themselves that everywhere else is filled with danger.

  42. How Capitalism Betrayed Privacy Opinion, April 10

    The forces of wealth creation once fostered the right to be left alone. But that has changed.

  43. A ‘Glitch’ Left Young People Off the Jury Rolls. Does That Violate the Constitution? U.S., April 10

    Computer glitches have compromised jury selection processes across the country. More trouble surfaced recently in a death penalty case in Louisiana.

  44. Amazon and Microsoft Are 2 Finalists for $10 Billion Pentagon Contract Technology, April 10

    The cloud computing project, known as JEDI, is one of the largest federal information technology contracts in history.

  45. What Women Know About the Internet Opinion, April 10

    The digital world is not designed to keep women safe. New regulations should be.

  46. A Bibliography on Privacy Opinion, April 10

    A running list of some of the best writing on the intersection of technology and privacy.

  47. Uber Is Said to Aim for I.P.O. Valuation of Up to $100 Billion Technology, April 10

    The ride-hailing giant gave some investors an initial estimate of its public market valuation, which ranged from $90 billion to $100 billion.

  48. Uber Is Said to Aim for I.P.O. Valuation of Up to $100 Billion Technology, April 10

    The ride-hailing giant gave some investors an initial estimate of its public market valuation, which ranged from $90 billion to $100 billion.

  49. I Didn’t Write This Column. I Spoke It. Opinion, April 10

    The screenless internet could be amazing — or terrible.

  50. To Purge Some of Social Media’s Ugliness, an Unlikely Lesson From Wall St. Business, April 10

    A simple rule that bolsters the banking system — “know your customer” — could help combat fake news and hate speech online if companies like Facebook and Twitter embraced it.

  51. Over 4,200 Amazon Workers Push for Climate Change Action, Including Cutting Some Ties to Big Oil Technology, April 10

    They say Amazon should stop offering custom cloud computing services that help the oil and gas industry explore for and extract more fossil fuels.

  52. Net Neutrality Bill Passes House, Fulfilling Promise by Democrats Technology, April 10

    The legislation, called the Save the Internet Act, faces long odds in the Republican-led Senate.

  53. Net Neutrality Vote Passes House, Fulfilling Promise by Democrats Technology, April 10

    The legislation, called the Save the Internet Act, faces long odds in the Republican-led Senate.

  54. Lifting Journalism by Knowing What Readers Are Looking For Technology, April 10

    Claudio E. Cabrera, who specializes in search engine optimization, describes how he keeps track of what’s hot in search and how that informs coverage — and what the limits are.

  55. Organizing Your Unwieldy Photo Collection Is Easier Than You Think Technology, April 10

    Here is the trick: Let your smartphone do the work.

  56. R.I.P. to a Startling Facebook Feature: Reminders of Dead Friends’ Birthdays Technology, April 10

    The company said it had improved artificial intelligence to stop dead people’s profiles “from showing up in places that might cause distress.”

  57. How to Go Paperless in Your Home Office Smarter Living, April 9

    Here’s how to save your tax records digitally so you can get rid of the paper in your home office.

  58. The Key to Cheap Internet Service: A Local SIM Card Travel, April 9

    Want cheap data and phone calls when you’re abroad? Here’s how.

  59. Animal Videos Are How We Escape the Internet (While on the Internet) Magazine, April 9

    The online world is an interactive museum of humiliation, bad faith and gross memes. This is why we need parrots trolling cats.

  60. Wikipedia Isn’t Officially a Social Network. But the Harassment Can Get Ugly. U.S., April 8

    Unlike at social networks such as Facebook and Twitter, the people who respond to reports of harassment are largely unpaid volunteers.

  61. Pinterest Dials Down Expectations as I.P.O. Nears Technology, April 7

    The digital pin board company set a price range for its I.P.O. that would value the business below its last private market valuation of $12 billion.

  62. Pinterest Dials Down Expectations as I.P.O. Nears Technology, April 7

    The digital pin board company set a price range for its I.P.O. that would value the business below its last private market valuation of $12 billion.

  63. Britain Proposes Broad New Powers to Regulate Internet Content Business, April 7

    A growing number of countries are now eager to punish Facebook and other internet companies for harmful material on their platforms.

  64. Facebook Wants a Faux Regulator for Internet Speech. It Won’t Happen. Opinion, April 7

    Not in the United States, anyway.

  65. In China, an App About Xi Is Impossible to Ignore — Even if You Try World, April 7

    Millions of Chinese are using the app as part of President Xi’s efforts to strengthen ideological control in the digital age. Critics say it fuels a personality cult.

  66. The Best Year of Our Lives Opinion, April 6

    Twenty years later, we still haven't partied like we did in 1999.

  67. Why the Cool Kids Are Playing Dungeons & Dragons Opinion, April 6

    Fighting the dragon queen Tiamat is a much more satisfying way to spend time with my friends than social media ever was.

  68. How Do You Print Out the Entire Internet? Reader Center, April 6

    You can’t. So when we set out to adapt Amanda Hess’s “Internetting” video series for the print paper, we wanted to amplify qualities of the internet while celebrating the print reading experience.

  69. Meet the Man Behind Trump’s Biden Tweet Opinion, April 6

    A stay-at-home dad in Kansas reveals how the lines have blurred between viral trolling and the business of politics.

  70. I’m a Tech Addict and I’m Not Ashamed Opinion, April 5

    Lots of people have talked about the downsides of tech. But something can be convenient and good for you at the same time.

  71. The Week in Tech: Facebook Is Desperate to Shape Tech Regulation. Should It? Technology, April 5

    Asking tech leaders how to regulate their own industry might be like “asking the foxes how best to guard the henhouse.”

  72. How to Tap Less on Your Phone (but Get More Done) Smarter Living, April 4

    Most of us spend hours each day tapping the glass of our smartphones. But what if you could do just as much — maybe more — and give your fingers a break?

  73. Jeff Bezos, Amazon C.E.O., and MacKenzie Bezos Finalize Divorce Details Technology, April 4

    Mr. Bezos will keep 75 percent of the couple’s stock in Amazon, and all of their ownership of The Washington Post and Blue Origin space company, Ms. Bezos wrote.

  74. Jeff Bezos, Amazon C.E.O., and MacKenzie Bezos Finalize Divorce Details Technology, April 4

    Mr. Bezos will keep 75 percent of the couple’s stock in Amazon and all of their ownership of The Washington Post and Blue Origin space company, Ms. Bezos wrote.

  75. More Internet, Less Sex Opinion, April 4

    The modern decline of healthy social interactions.

  76. Uber but for Xi Jinping Opinion, April 4

    Shiny new app, same old propaganda.

  77. How A.S.M.R. Became a Sensation Magazine, April 4

    The brain-tingling feeling was a hard-to-describe psychological oddity. Until, suddenly, it was a YouTube phenomenon.

  78. A.I. and Privacy Concerns Get White House to Embrace Global Cooperation Technology, April 3

    In technology, the Trump administration has departed from its anti-regulatory, nationalist approach.

  79. Kick-Start Your Reading Habit With Bite-Sized Books Smarter Living, April 3

    If you don’t feel like you have the time to read more, or struggle to finish a book, this method will help. If you have time for Twitter or Instagram, you have time for these books.

  80. Whole Foods Cut Prices. It Saved Us 5 Cents. Technology, April 3

    The grocery chain’s “Whole Paycheck” reputation doesn’t appear to be threatened.

  81. Whole Foods Cut Prices. It Saved Us 5 Cents. Technology, April 3

    The grocery chain’s “Whole Paycheck” reputation doesn’t appear to be threatened.

  82. The Incredible Shrinking Apple Opinion, April 3

    Steve Jobs wanted to put a ding in the universe. Today, Apple wants to ding your pocketbook.

  83. Big Tech’s Original Sin Opinion, April 3

    Greed. It’s about greed.

  84. One Thing You Can Do: Keep Your Old Gadgets Out of the Trash Climate, April 3

    Also this week: How it felt to climb a 28-story ladder in pursuit of news. Our reporter was, he said, “a mess.”

  85. A.I. Experts Question Amazon’s Facial-Recognition Technology Technology, April 3

    At least 25 prominent researchers are calling on the company to stop selling the technology to law enforcement agencies, citing concerns that it has built-in biases.

  86. From Bubble Memory to Hot Spots and a Fly Rod Technology, April 3

    David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent, recounts his gear from the computers in use when he joined The Times in 1982 to his overloaded backpack now.

  87. Apple AirPods Review: The Perfect Earbuds, Except They Don’t Last Technology, April 3

    Sleek and convenient, Apple’s wireless earbuds are an engineering marvel. But they are difficult and expensive to maintain.

  88. Drug Sites Upend Doctor-Patient Relations: ‘It’s Restaurant-Menu Medicine’ Technology, April 2

    A new wave of websites turns physicians into mere gatekeepers for popular lifestyle drugs, increasing public health risks, experts say. The sites say they ease connections with doctors.

  89. Media Companies Take a Big Gamble on Apple Business, April 2

    Executives have been burned by their previous dealings with big tech companies. But Apple’s promise of a billion devices worldwide was too good to pass up. Even for Rupert Murdoch.

  90. There Are Probably Cameras on Your Flight, but Relax, They’re Not On (Yet) Business, April 2

    Since a traveler asked Singapore Airlines if the seat back on his flight contained a camera, two U.S. senators have asked questions and expressed concern.

  91. Fallback for Airline Pilots Opinion, April 2

    A reader calls for manual flight training, in the event that computer systems fail.

  92. Amid Bitcoin Uncertainty, ‘the Smart Money Knows That Crypto Is Not Ready’ Technology, April 2

    Cryptocurrency enthusiasts thought big financial institutions would lend credibility to their work. But last year’s crash has cooled their interest.

  93. Letter of Recommendation: Personality Cafe Magazine, April 2

    How I found a road map to my emotions on a decade-old online message board.

  94. How to Be Famous Online, According to Rickey Thompson Style, April 2

    The 23-year-old has turned likes into coins. Here is his guide.

  95. How to Make Your Phone Limit Your Screen Time for You Smarter Living, April 1

    The latest iPhone and the newest version of Google’s Android come with tools to limit how much time you stare at your screen. Here’s how to make them useful instead of nags you’ll eventually turn off.

  96. In India Election, False Posts and Hate Speech Flummox Facebook Technology, April 1

    With as many as 879 million eligible voters set to cast ballots in the coming weeks, Facebook is struggling to cope with the disinformation and hate speech that is circulating online.

  97. Lyft Drops Below I.P.O. Price in Second Day of Trading Technology, April 1

    The rapid decline raises questions about investors’ appetite for fast-growing but unprofitable tech companies.

  98. Lyft’s Stock Drops Below I.P.O. Price in Second Day of Trading Technology, April 1

    The rapid decline raises questions about investors’ appetite for fast-growing but unprofitable tech companies.

  99. A Journey — if You Dare — Into the Minds of Silicon Valley Programmers Books, April 1

    Clive Thompson’s “Coders” demystifies the work done to create the algorithms and programs that have come to dominate our world.

  100. Singapore Plans Law to Fight False News, but Critics Fear Repression World, April 1

    The government says the legislation would combat misinformation that harms the public interest, but rights advocates worry that it could be used to mute free speech.

  101. Behold the Beefless ‘Impossible Whopper’ Technology, April 1

    Burger King is introducing a Whopper made with a vegetarian patty from the start-up Impossible Foods. The deal is a big step toward the mainstream for start-ups trying to mimic and replace meat.

  102. These Silicon Valley Investors’ Bets May Pay Off Technology, March 31

    A herd of technology public offerings this year and next year is set to anoint venture capital winners. Here are some of them.

  103. How We Hang Out at Work Together Online Now Style, March 31

    Instagram is for vacations. Facebook is for families. But TikTok takes us into the classrooms, airplanes, firehouses and fast-food franchises of our real lives.

  104. Why Courtrooms Are Kryptonite for Alex Jones Opinion, March 31

    Shock jocks lose their power when forced to tell the truth, the whole truth.

  105. Countries Want to Ban ‘Weaponized’ Social Media. What Would That Look Like? World, March 31

    No established democracies have ever come as close to applying such sweeping restrictions as Australia and New Zealand are considering in the wake of the Christchurch mosque shootings.

  106. Mark Zuckerberg’s Call to Regulate Facebook, Explained Technology, March 30

    Here’s why the Facebook chief executive invited Congress to regulate his company in a post on Saturday.

  107. Bezos’ Security Consultant Accuses Saudis of Hacking the Amazon C.E.O.’s Phone Technology, March 30

    The accusations by Gavin de Becker, Mr. Bezos’ longtime security consultant, are the latest twist in a bizarre situation that has also pulled in the largest U.S. tabloid publisher and The Washington Post.

  108. Facebook Faces a Reckoning for Redlining Opinion, March 29

    The government says that advertising designed to exclude certain groups violates the Fair Housing Act.

  109. Lyft’s Shares Jump in Trading Debut, Cementing Rise of the Gig Economy Technology, March 29

    An I.P.O. underscored the depth of investor hunger for fast-growing young tech businesses, even if they are deeply unprofitable.

  110. YouTube’s Product Chief on Online Radicalization and Algorithmic Rabbit Holes Technology, March 29

    Neal Mohan discusses the streaming site’s recommendation engine, which has become a growing liability amid accusations that it steers users to increasingly extreme content.

  111. He Helped Create A.I. Now, He Worries About ‘Killer Robots.’ World, March 29

    Still, Yoshua Bengio, an artificial intelligence pioneer and co-winner of this year’s prestigious A.M. Turing prize, says A.I. will prove to be a boon, if regulated.

  112. The Week in Tech: Who Should Let Driverless Cars Off the Leash? Technology, March 29

    As Uber and Lyft go public, financial interest in getting truly driverless cars on the road will mount. That shouldn’t mean it happens in a rush.

  113. Huawei Shrugs Off U.S. Clampdown With a $100 Billion Year Technology, March 28

    Washington wants to thwart the Chinese tech giant’s dominance in telecom networks around the world. For now, though, sales at Huawei are booming.

  114. The Mounting Federal Investigations Into Facebook Technology, March 28

    The giant social network faces scrutiny of its business practices by numerous federal agencies.

  115. Lyft Prices I.P.O. at $72 a Share Technology, March 28

    Lyft’s I.P.O. heralds a new generation of Silicon Valley darlings on the public markets. Uber, Pinterest and Slack are expected to follow.

  116. N.S.A. Contractor Arrested in Biggest Breach of U.S. Secrets Pleads Guilty U.S., March 28

    The contractor, Harold Martin, was arrested in 2016, but investigators never found evidence that he had shared stolen classified information with anyone.

  117. A Watchful Eye on Facebook’s Advertising Practices Opinion, March 28

    Is the social media giant finally facing consequences for ads that discriminate?

  118. Facebook Engages in Housing Discrimination With Its Ad Practices, U.S. Says U.S., March 28

    The Department of Housing and Urban Development sued the company for violating the federal Fair Housing Act by limiting who sees ads based on characteristics like race, religion and national origin.

  119. Facebook Engages in Housing Discrimination With Its Ad Practices, U.S. Says U.S., March 28

    The Department of Housing and Urban Development sued the company for violating the federal Fair Housing Act by limiting who sees ads based on characteristics like race, religion and national origin.

  120. Do You Understand Elizabeth Warren’s Plan for Fixing Big Tech? Opinion, March 28

    Politicians have lots of ideas for regulating big tech. Here’s how to know which ones work.

  121. Huawei Security ‘Defects’ Are Found by British Authorities Technology, March 28

    Britain bolstered White House claims that the Chinese company poses a cybersecurity risk. But the report stopped short of calling for a ban on Huawei products.

  122. ‘Avocado Toast’ Is Now a Paint Color Style, March 28

    What, you thought the home décor industry was going to escape millennial disruption?

  123. How to Protect Your Smart Home From Hackers Smarter Living, March 27

    Smart home devices can make life more convenient, but may put you at risk of being hacked. Ensure your safety with a few simple measures.

  124. Microsoft Seizes Websites It Traces to Iranian Hackers Technology, March 27

    By taking control of the sites, Microsoft can stop future cyberattacks and monitor how infected computers were compromised.

  125. Facebook Announces New Policy to Ban White Nationalist Content Business, March 27

    Facebook said the policy change was based on a shift in its understanding of white nationalism, which it previously saw as different from white supremacy.

  126. No Earrings, Tattoos or Cleavage: Inside China’s War on Fun Business, March 27

    The Communist Party wants to instill the people with “core socialist values.” That means winnowing out content that extols individualism or hedonism.

  127. A Favorite Tool While Reporting on Start-Ups: Paper? Technology, March 27

    Erin Griffith explains how Silicon Valley’s hot young companies are no longer churning out must-use apps and gadgets on an everyday basis.

  128. Three Pioneers in Artificial Intelligence Win Turing Award Technology, March 27

    For their work on neural networks, Geoffrey Hinton, Yann LeCun and Yoshua Bengio will share $1 million for what many consider the Nobel Prize of computing.

  129. Turing Award Won by 3 Pioneers in Artificial Intelligence Technology, March 27

    For their work on neural networks, Geoffrey Hinton, Yann LeCun and Yoshua Bengio will share $1 million for what many consider the Nobel Prize of computing.

  130. Stop Ignoring Those ‘Update Your Device’ Messages Opinion, March 27

    Even though the Asus malware attack was spread through software updates, the best way to protect yourself online is to keep your software updated.

  131. Protecting Your Internet Accounts Keeps Getting Easier. Here’s How to Do It. Technology, March 27

    There are many tools for setting up two-factor authentication, a security mechanism that prevents improper access. These four methods are the most compelling.

  132. How We Sped Through 900 Pages of Cohen Documents in Under 10 Minutes Reader Center, March 26

    A tool called DocumentHelper, developed by our Interactive News team, helped the reporters Benjamin Weiser and William K. Rashbaum find needles in a haystack.

  133. Inside Google’s Rebooted Robotics Program Technology, March 26

    In 2013, the company started an ambitious, flashy effort to create robots. Now, its goals are more modest, but the technology is subtly more advanced.

  134. A.I. Is Flying Drones (Very, Very Slowly) Technology, March 26

    Artificial intelligence has bested top players in chess, Go and even StarCraft. But can it fly a drone faster than a pro racer? More than $1 million is on the line to find out.

  135. Europe Adopts Tough New Online Copyright Rules Over Tech Industry Protests Business, March 26

    The strict copyright law will require Google and other technology companies to compensate musicians, authors and news publishers.

  136. Europe Adopts Tough New Online Copyright Rules Over Tech Industry Protests Business, March 26

    The strict copyright law will require Google and other technology companies to compensate musicians, authors and news publishers.

  137. Why Is Silicon Valley So Obsessed With the Virtue of Suffering? Style, March 26

    The Stoics and friends continue to be the dominant thought leaders from Google to Apple — and a new entrepreneur lobbying firm has even named itself Cicero.

  138. Apple Unveils Video Service With Celebrity Parade but Few Details Technology, March 25

    The iPhone maker is partnering with Hollywood heavyweights and publishers to provide broad new services to its users.

  139. Is Apple Saying Goodbye to Fashion? Fashion, March 25

    When Apple introduced the Apple Watch five years ago, the whole tech industry began to flirt with style. But interest in wearables has cooled.

  140. He Tried to Bilk Google and Facebook Out of $100 Million With Fake Invoices Business, March 25

    A Lithuanian man pleaded guilty last week to wire fraud and said he was part of a scheme to imitate vendors and fraudulently invoice corporations.

  141. The Internet’s Endless Appetite for Death Video Style, March 24

    Facebook video of the Christchurch mosque killings showed that people, not algorithms, want to share murder, gore and violence.

  142. Depressed and Anxious? These Video Games Want to Help Technology, March 24

    A growing number of games are taking on mental health issues like depression, anger and post-traumatic stress disorder.

  143. Hey, Look at Me! I’m a Venture Capitalist Technology, March 24

    As high-profile start-ups like Lyft, Pinterest and Uber prepare to go public, Silicon Valley venture capitalists are using the moment to shine the spotlight on themselves.

  144. This Friendship Has Been Digitized Opinion, March 23

    Do I need to explain to my son that a bot will never have his back?

  145. Human Contact Is Now a Luxury Good Sunday Review, March 23

    Screens used to be for the elite. Now avoiding them is a status symbol.

  146. When a Phone App Opens Your Apartment Door, but You Just Want a Key New York, March 23

    Residents of a Manhattan building where tenants must use an app to open the lobby door have filed a lawsuit challenging the practice.

  147. Pinterest Is Rare ‘Unicorn’ Preparing an I.P.O. Without Hemorrhaging Cash Technology, March 22

    The start-up, which lets people create virtual “pin boards,” officially joined the herd of tech companies stampeding to the public markets this year by unveiling its offering prospectus.

  148. Why Netflix Won’t Be Part of Apple TV Business, March 22

    The first skirmishes have already been fought in what could turn into a tech cold war. “The game is on,” said the Netflix chief executive, Reed Hastings.

  149. Teenager Arrested in Charlottesville After Racist Online Threat Shuts Schools for 2 Days U.S., March 22

    A user on 4chan promised an “ethnic cleansing in my school” in a post that targeted black and Hispanic students.

  150. The Week in Tech: Our Future Robots Will Need Super-Smart Safety Checks Technology, March 22

    Software looks to be at the heart of the recent Ethiopian Airlines crash. Safety approval of such systems will only get harder as technology advances.