T/coronavirus

  1. New coronavirus cases around the world reached a new weekly record, according to the W.H.O. World, Today

    The surge is being driven largely by an outbreak in India, where the authorities reported nearly 300,000 new cases on Wednesday alone.

  2. New coronavirus cases around the world reached a new weekly record. Foreign, Today

    The surge is being driven largely by an outbreak in India, where the authorities reported nearly 300,000 new cases on Wednesday alone.

  3. The Years We’ve Lost to Covid Parenting, Today

    Some experts insist it’s more important to track the time we’ve lost to the pandemic rather than the lives.

  4. Nation Faces ‘Hand-to-Hand Combat’ to Get Reluctant Americans Vaccinated Washington, Today

    Half of American adults have received at least one shot of the coronavirus vaccine. Now comes the hard part: persuading the other half to get it.

  5. In Vermont, Isolating Inmates Kept Covid at Bay, but at a Price National, Today

    The state prison system is the only one in the nation where no one has died of Covid-19. But the strict lockdowns and quarantines that slowed the virus created their own problems.

  6. U.S. regulators cite shortcomings after inspecting a Baltimore plant where J.&J. doses were ruined. Washington, Today

    The Food and Drug Administration issued highly critical findings from an inspection of the plant that was forced to throw out up to 15 million doses of Johnson & Johnson’s coronavirus vaccine and ordered to temporarily stop all production.

  7. India’s Health System Cracks Under the Strain as Coronavirus Cases Surge Foreign, Today

    At least 22 people died from loss of oxygen in a hospital accident. Infections hit a daily record. And the government faced criticism for allowing an enormous Hindu festival to continue.

  8. El malestar que sientes tiene un nombre: se llama languidez en Español, Today

    La languidez es una sensación de estancamiento y vacío. Se siente como si uno estuviera pasando los días sin rumbo, mirando la vida a través de un parabrisas empañado. Y podría ser la emoción dominante de 2021.

  9. Consejos para viajar de manera segura durante la pandemia en Español, Today

    Aunque las vacunas han logrado que viajar sea más seguro, planificar una travesía se ha convertido en un proceso complicado.

  10. Mi hija y yo estamos atrapadas en la tragedia de Brasil en Español, Today

    Pasamos los días viendo ambulancias, mientras la COVID-19 arrasa con el país.

  11. Minha filha e eu estamos presas na tragédia do Brasil Opinion, Today

    Passamos os dias vendo ambulâncias enquanto a Covid-19 assola o país.

  12. ‘Nos quedamos sin nada’: la miseria de Argentina se hace más profunda durante la pandemia en Español, Today

    La economía se contrajo casi un 10 por ciento el año pasado y el país enfrenta un ajuste de cuentas con el FMI con más de 45.000 millones de dólares en deudas.

  13. Antibody rates among Black and Hispanic New Yorkers are double those of others, new estimates show. Metro, Today

    A study found at least a third of Black and Hispanic New York City residents had antibodies after the first wave a year ago, but only 16 percent of white New Yorkers did.

  14. Welcome to the YOLO Economy Business, Today

    Burned out and flush with savings, some workers are quitting stable jobs in search of postpandemic adventure.

  15. How to Deal With the Rental Car Crunch Travel, Today

    The pandemic has wreaked havoc in the rental car industry, leading to a shortage of cars and sticker shock for travelers. Here are some tips for finding an affordable one.

  16. Nation Faces ‘Hand-to-Hand Combat’ to Get Reluctant Americans Vaccinated Washington, Today

    Half of American adults have received at least one shot of the coronavirus vaccine. Now comes the hard part: persuading the other half to get it.

  17. A New Bird Flu Jumps to Humans. So Far, It’s Not a Problem. Science, Today

    Covid fuels the current virus pandemic, but the world is full of flu viruses waiting in the wings. And they keep changing unpredictably.

  18. A New Bird Flu Jumps to Humans. So Far, It’s Not a Problem. Science, Today

    Covid fuels the current virus pandemic, but the world is full of flu viruses waiting in the wings. And they keep changing unpredictably.

  19. A Year Later, So Many Adjustments in the Dress Industry Styles, Today

    Designers are finding ways to stay alive after the economic tailspin caused by the pandemic. But optimism and determination have returned.

  20. J. & J. to Resume E.U. Vaccine Rollout, With Warning of Rare Side Effect Foreign, Yesterday

    With the Johnson & Johnson vaccine paused in the United States, the European Union drug regulator found that the benefits outweigh the rare risk of blood clots.

  21. Tech in the Post-Pandemic World Op Ed, Yesterday

    Assessing its future, both the bad and the good.

  22. Is It Time to End Outdoor Masking? Op Ed, Yesterday

    “We’ve known for a year that outdoor infections are extremely rare.”

  23. How India Allowed the Virus to Overwhelm It Op Ed, Yesterday

    Complacency and lack of preparation by the Indian government pushed the country into an unprecedented crisis.

  24. For Vaccine Passports, Less Tech Is Best Business, Yesterday

    We need dumb technology that does as little as possible and knows as little about us as possible.

  25. For Vaccine Passports, Less Tech Is Best Business, Yesterday

    We need dumb technology that does as little as possible and knows as little about us as possible.

  26. ‘Peter Grimes’ Sails on Choppy Seas of Brexit and the Pandemic Culture, Yesterday

    A production of Benjamin Britten’s opera at the Teatro Real in Madrid highlights the difficult new conditions for British artists working in the European Union.

  27. Jeremiah Trusty, Singer, Model, Actor, Dies at 38 Obits, Yesterday

    Of all his endeavors, singing was the most important. He had recently recorded a song that he hoped would be his breakthrough. He died of Covid-19.

  28. J.&J. will resume its Europe vaccine rollout after the E.U.’s regulator says the shot should carry a label. Foreign, Yesterday

    The agency says the Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine should have a warning for a potential risk for rare blood clots even though it believes the shot’s benefits outweigh risks. The agency did not recommend stopping use of the vaccine.

  29. Developers Flock to Cold Storage as Americans Stock Their Freezers Business, Yesterday

    Companies are seeking to build, buy or invest in the sector, despite construction costs that are roughly triple that of an ordinary warehouse.

  30. Will You Need a Vaccine Passport in California? National, Yesterday

    Tuesday: A guide to the debate over vaccine verification.

  31. Vaccine eligibility is now wide in the U.S., but one-fifth of older people still need a shot. World, Yesterday

  32. Restaurants Fought for Covid Survival, With Some Tech Helpers Business, Yesterday

    Being “online” in the pandemic, many chefs learned, meant much more than having an Instagram account.

  33. No, We Don’t Know if Vaccines Change Your Period Op Ed, Yesterday

    We do know that researchers do not study menstruation enough.

  34. That Anxiety You’re Feeling? It’s a Habit You Can Unlearn. Op Ed, Yesterday

    An addiction psychiatrist’s counterintuitive approach to dealing with worry, craving and anxiety.

  35. You Pfizer, Me Moderna: Vaccine Recipients Declare Loyalty Styles, Yesterday

    Along with comparison of side effects, there is pride, relief and merch.

  36. You Pfizer, Me Moderna: Vaccine Recipients Declare Loyalty Styles, Yesterday

    Along with comparison of side effects, there is pride, relief and merch.

  37. How the Pandemic Did, and Didn’t, Change Where Americans Move Interactive, April 19

    As disruptive as the pandemic has been, for the most part it hasn’t altered the underlying forces shaping where people want to live.

  38. Health Agencies Compromised Safety of Evacuees and Staff Early in Pandemic, Watchdog Says Washington, April 19

    A new report from the Government Accountability Office on the repatriation effort last year said that poor training and bureaucratic infighting left Americans unsafe.

  39. U.S. Readies Small-Business Grants as P.P.P. Nears End Business, April 19

    New programs for restaurants and live-event businesses will soon start taking applications as the Paycheck Protection Program winds down.

  40. U.S. health officials are examining ‘a handful’ of new, unconfirmed reports after J.& J. vaccine pause, the C.D.C. director says. Washington, April 19

    Officials are trying to determine whether the reports might be cases of a rare, serious blood clotting disorder. It’s unclear whether the vaccine was responsible for the original cases.

  41. A confused federal effort to retrieve Americans overseas in the initial outbreak led to safety risks, a new report says. Washington, April 19

    The federal report concluded that the evacuation of Americans from China bogged down badly as different divisions within the federal health department argued over which was responsible.

  42. Jerry Lee Albin, Who Found Sobriety After a Hard Life, Dies at 75 Obits, April 19

    Mr. Albin put drugs, prison and biker gangs behind him, started a construction business and counseled prisoners. He died of complications of the coronavirus.

  43. The Solitary Queen Elizabeth: An Iconic Image Letters, April 19

    A reader says no other picture has captured our experience as a world since the onset of Covid. Also: Leave Karen alone; yoga as a path to wisdom.

  44. U.S. to Begin Offering Vaccines to Detainees at Guantánamo Bay Washington, April 19

    The plan, initiated during the Trump administration, had been delayed after a political and public outcry.

  45. New Yorkers can soon get vaccinated under the natural history museum’s big blue whale. Metro, April 19

    Starting Friday, all New York City residents will be eligible to receive a coronavirus vaccine at the American Museum of Natural History.

  46. With Universal Eligibility, a Fifth of Seniors Remain Unvaccinated Interactive, April 19

    Older adults have been eligible for Covid-19 vaccines for months, but some still have not gotten a shot, and progress is uneven from state to state.

  47. My Daughter and I Are Trapped in Brazil’s Tragedy Op Ed, April 19

    We spend our days watching ambulances, as Covid-19 rips through the country.

  48. New York Spent $1.5 Billion on Its Convention Center. Will Anyone Come? Metro, April 19

    The expansion of the Javits Center is almost complete, but the pandemic has kept it from hosting events for more than a year.

  49. There’s a Name for the Blah You’re Feeling: It’s Called Languishing Well, April 19

    The neglected middle child of mental health can dull your motivation and focus — and it may be the dominant emotion of 2021.

  50. Adults in all U.S. states are now eligible for vaccination, hitting Biden’s target. Half have had at least one dose. National, April 19

    Hawaii, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island and Vermont were the last states to expand eligibility on Monday. More than 131 million Americans have received at least one shot of a Covid-19 vaccine.

  51. ‘We Were Left With Nothing’: Argentina’s Misery Deepens in the Pandemic Business, April 19

    The economy contracted by nearly 10 percent last year, and the country faces a reckoning with the I.M.F. over $45 billion in debts.

  52. Las variantes del coronavirus no deben asustarnos en Español, April 19

    Las mutaciones de los virus son constantes, pero no siempre peligrosas. Sin embargo, necesitamos seguir con la inmunización y mantener una actitud vigilante.

  53. Emerging From the Pandemic With Acne, Facial Hair and Body Odor Well, April 19

    Young people experiencing the body changes of puberty without being in school are facing a unique set of challenges. Here’s how parents can support them.

  54. What Snoop Dogg’s Success Says About the Book Industry Books, April 18

    Will the shifts brought on by the pandemic, favoring online retailers over bookstores and established authors over new ones, change publishing forever?

  55. ‘¿Cuándo me va a tocar a mí?’: la envidia de ver que tus conocidos ya se vacunaron en Español, April 19

    A medida que algunas personas comienzan a deshacerse de las precauciones contra el coronavirus, los que esperan su turno para una vacuna dicen que tienen sentimientos encontrados por no haberse inmunizado.

  56. N.F.L. Draft Process Adapts With the Pandemic Sports, April 19

    Players and scouts adjusted their methods to account for the absence of a traditional combine in Indianapolis.

  57. Michigan’s governor says the virus surge in her state may be cresting. U.S., April 18

    The curve of new cases may finally be flattening in Michigan, the hardest-hit state in the nation this spring, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said on Sunday.

  58. Your Monday Briefing N Y T Now, April 18

    Aleksei Navalny “could die at any moment,” his personal doctors say.

  59. Aiming at variants, France will limit and quarantine travelers from Brazil, Argentina, Chile and South Africa. Foreign, April 18

    As of April 24, entry into the country will be restricted, and those who qualify will be subject to a 10-day quarantine.

  60. The N.I.H. awards $33 million to fund research on coronavirus testing in schools. World, April 18

    Institutes around the country will work to expand testing to enable safe reopenings and build trust in urban and rural areas, and among Native Americans.

  61. Colorado health officials warn of a new surge as counties loosen virus restrictions. National, April 18

    Health officials say rising case counts are fueled in part by more contagious coronavirus variants, particularly B.1.1.7, the variant first found in Britain.

  62. New York City expands walk-in vaccinations to people 50 and older. World, April 18

    The eligibility expansion comes as vaccination appointments open up. The city remains at high risk for infections, but relatively stable.

  63. Pope Francis delivers his Sunday blessing to pilgrims in St. Peter’s Square for the first time in a month. Foreign, April 18

    Throughout the pandemic, the pope has often delivered the weekly address, prayer and blessing from the apostolic library, with no public in attendance.

  64. Israel, a world leader in vaccinations, lifts its outdoor mask mandate. Foreign, April 18

    Daily new coronavirus infections in the country have fallen from a peak of 10,000 in January to around 100 on some recent days.

  65. Fauci says he expects a decision Friday on whether the U.S. can resume using Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine. Science, April 18

    Dr. Anthony Fauci said that he expected experts meeting at the end of the week to recommend “some sort of either warning or restriction.”

  66. New cases in Turkey soar to a record high, with Istanbul hit hardest. World, April 18

    Though restrictions have been tightened a bit for Ramadan. critics say they remain too weak to stem the coronavirus surge.

  67. Airport vaccinations are just a flight away. To Alaska. Foreign, April 18

    Alaska is the 22d state to announce plans to vaccinate nonresidents against the coronavirus.

  68. Airport vaccinations are just a flight away. To Alaska. National, April 18

    Alaska is the 22d state to announce plans to vaccinate nonresidents against the coronavirus.

  69. The Sunday Read: ‘Voices Carry’ Podcasts, April 18

    What will it take to get the choir of Washington’s Skagit Valley — and the rest of the world’s choral musicians — back together again?

  70. The Week in Business: Let’s Go Shopping Sunday Business, April 18

    Consumer spending is up — way up! — as Americans grow more optimistic about the economy.

  71. One America News Network Stays True to Trump Business, April 18

    A recent OAN segment said there were “serious doubts about who’s actually president,” and another blamed “anti-Trump extremists” for the Capitol attack.

  72. How the Tiny Kingdom of Bhutan Out-Vaccinated Most of the World Foreign, April 18

    The Himalayan nation has given more than 60 percent of its people a shot. Some villages were reached by helicopter, and health workers hiked through ice and snow.

  73. How Safe Are You From Covid When You Fly? Interactive, April 17

    As vaccines become widely available and restrictions are eased, millions of people are flying again, raising questions about just how safe it is now to board a flight.

  74. Banish Anxiety About Your Post-Lockdown Looks At Home, April 17

    The coronavirus changed so much about our lives, including, for many of us, our bodies. It’s OK.

  75. A Window Into a Changed America Summary, April 17

    In a National desk project, people across the country describe, in their own words, how the pandemic has transformed the way they live, work and think.

  76. Ontario, hit with a virus surge, backtracks on sweeping new police powers. Foreign, April 17

    Canada has inched ahead of the United States in new daily coronavirus cases per capita, and officials warned that worse is to come.

  77. Ron DeSantis Is the Republican Autopsy Op Ed, April 17

    As their theory of how to move past Donald Trump, G.O.P. insiders have the governor of Florida.

  78. Virus cases and hospitalizations rise sharply in Pennsylvania, as dozens of other states see high caseloads. National, April 17

    The U.S. vaccination campaign’s race against the spread of variants — especially B.1.1.7 — is being hobbled by rebounding U.S. tourism and entrenched vaccine hesitancy.

  79. The Covid-19 Plasma Boom Is Over. What Did We Learn From It? Science, April 17

    The U.S. government invested $800 million in plasma when the country was desperate for Covid-19 treatments. A year later, the program has fizzled.

  80. Biden Administration Ends Limits on Use of Fetal Tissue for Research Science, April 17

    The decision reverses Trump administration rules and allows scientists to use tissue derived from elective abortions to develop treatments for diseases including cancer and AIDS.

  81. Biden Administration Ends Limits on Use of Fetal Tissue for Research Science, April 17

    The decision reverses Trump administration rules and allows scientists to use tissue derived from elective abortions to develop treatments for diseases including cancer and AIDS.

  82. ‘Be Kind Whenever Possible. It Is Always Possible.’ Letters, April 17

    We asked readers about their life philosophies. We published a selection of their responses last weekend, and now are highlighting several more.

  83. Why Anti-Abortion Catholics Should Get Vaccinated Op Ed, April 17

    Qualms about the vaccines’ development are not entirely misguided. But we can make amends for past injustice.

  84. As Covid Death Toll Passes 3 Million, a Weary World Takes Stock Foreign, April 17

    “It just never crossed your mind that there would be so many dead in so little time,” said one man in Mexico City.

  85. A weary world takes stock as the global death toll from Covid-19 passes 3 million. World, April 17

  86. One Way to Get People Off the Streets: Buy Hotels Sunday Business, April 17

    For homeless people, a place to live is life changing to a degree that almost no other intervention can provide.

  87. Realtors Want to Sell You a Home. Their Trade Group Backs Evicting Others. Business, April 17

    The National Association of Realtors is advocating an end to a pandemic-era order meant to keep renters in their homes.

  88. Lo que las mujeres deben saber sobre las vacunas para la covid en Español, April 17

    ¿Afecta el pinchazo al resultado de las mamografías, los tratamientos de fertilidad y la menstruación? Los expertos responden estas y más dudas.

  89. These Countries Did Well With Covid. So Why Are They Slow on Vaccines? Foreign, April 17

    Japan, South Korea and Australia have inoculated tiny percentages of their populations. The delays risk unwinding their relative successes.

  90. Can Covid Research Help Solve the Mysteries of Other Viruses? Science, April 17

    The coronavirus may help scientists understand why some people with common viral infections develop severe complications, like heart damage or blood clots.

  91. Least Vaccinated U.S. Counties Have Something in Common: Trump Voters Interactive, April 17

    A Times analysis found that willingness to receive a vaccine and actual vaccination rates to date were both lower, on average, in counties that voted red in the 2020 presidential election.

  92. Months Before Season, N.F.L. and Players Clash Over Pandemic Workouts Sports, April 16

    Players on 15 teams announced they would not attend off-season programming because of concerns about the coronavirus. Some may give up financial benefits in the process.

  93. ‘We Were Flying Blind’: A Dr.’s Account of a Woman’s J.&J. Vaccine-Related Blood Clot Case Science, April 16

    The disorder is rare, but so severe that the vaccine is on hold while experts weigh the risks and alert doctors and patients about symptoms and treatment.

  94. Pregnant women in Britain will be offered Covid-19 vaccines. Foreign, April 16

    Early in the pandemic, Britain had recommended against vaccines for pregnant women, citing a lack of research on side effects.

  95. A Week of Discouraging, Frightening and Frustrating Pandemic Developments Foreign, April 16

    Canada inched ahead of the United States on new daily coronavirus cases per capita and officials warned that worse is to come.

  96. A Week of Discouraging, Frightening and Frustrating Pandemic Developments Foreign, April 16

    Canada inched ahead of the United States on new daily coronavirus cases per capita and officials warned that worse is to come.

  97. The global death toll from Covid-19 is nearing 3 million. World, April 16

    The number of confirmed coronavirus cases has surged to nearly 140 million as dangerous virus variants spread and countries race to provide enough vaccines.

  98. The global death toll from Covid-19 is nearing 3 million. Foreign, April 16

    The number of confirmed coronavirus cases has surged to nearly 140 million as dangerous virus variants spread and countries race to provide enough vaccines.

  99. The global death toll from Covid-19 is nearing 3 million. Foreign, April 16

    The number of confirmed coronavirus cases has surged to nearly 140 million as dangerous virus variants spread and countries race to provide enough vaccines.

  100. Hang Out With Your Vaccinated Friends Op Ed, April 16

    Still waiting for your Covid-19 vaccine dose? Here’s one way to stay safe and keep cases down until your appointment.

  101. Another Unlikely Pandemic Shortage: Boba Tea Business, April 16

    The popular drink’s main ingredient, tapioca pearls, could soon be in short supply because of delays in unloading cargo ships from Asia.

  102. Feeling a Bit Cramped? ‘Couples Therapy’ May Look Familiar Culture, April 16

    The Showtime docu-series lets viewers eavesdrop on real-life counseling sessions. The new season looks at relationships struggling under quarantine.

  103. Why I Fear Movies Won’t Be the Same Without the ArcLight Culture, April 16

    For the director Gina Prince-Bythewood, seeing her movie premiere there or just a poster for it on display was a sign that her work mattered. News of the closure hit hard.

  104. Shelia Smith, Exuberant Teacher’s Aide, Dies at 61 Obits, April 16

    At her rural Alabama school, she was beloved by students, especially those with special needs, and by her colleagues. She died of complications of Covid-19.

  105. Vaccine hesitancy runs high in some African countries, in some cases leaving unused doses to expire. Foreign, April 16

    Thousands of doses have gone to waste in Malawi and South Sudan.

  106. In Italy, younger people are accused of jumping the line to get the vaccine. Foreign, April 16

    “How can people in all conscience jump the line?” Prime Minister Mario Draghi said. “Knowing that they leave exposed a person who is over 75 to a risk, a concrete risk of dying, or a fragile person?”

  107. Why the Vaccine Safety Numbers Are Still Fuzzy Upshot, April 16

    Putting a risk in context: The rate of blood clots is extremely low, but the pause in the Johnson & Johnson vaccine could reveal more cases.

  108. Gearing Up for the ‘New Normal’ Well, April 16

    In “The New Normal,” Dr. Jennifer Ashton explores the mental health repercussions of the pandemic and ways to rebuild our overall health.

  109. Unemployment Is High. Why Are Businesses Struggling to Hire? Upshot, April 16

    Health concerns, expanded jobless benefits and still being needed at home are among the reasons would-be workers might be staying away.

  110. White House Announces Nearly $2 Billion Plan to Track Variants Video, April 16

    Andy Slavitt, a White House pandemic adviser, announced a $1.7 billion plan on Friday to bolster the nation’s ability to monitor coronavirus variants through genomic sequencing.

  111. Another Unlikely Pandemic Shortage: Boba Tea Business, April 16

    The popular drink’s main ingredient, tapioca pearls, could soon be in short supply because of delays in unloading cargo ships from Asia.

  112. The White House details a nearly $2 billion plan to enhance the tracking of variants. Washington, April 16

    Public health experts have said the move is desperately needed to help forestall another devastating surge of coronavirus cases.

  113. Should Vaccinations Be Required for Some? Letters, April 16

    Readers offer different views. “If it requires a mandate to bring this pandemic under control, the sooner the better,” one reader says. Another cites “personal concerns” about the vaccine.

  114. That Popular S.U.V. Is Going to Cost You Business, April 16

    Demand plus production delays have tightened the supply of new models. That means fewer deals. The only good news? Your trade-in may get a better price.

  115. The Carpenter Who Built Tiny Homes for Toronto’s Homeless Foreign, April 16

    Khaleel Seivwright built himself a wooden shanty while living on a West Coast commune. Then he started building similar lodgings for homeless people in Toronto to survive the winter.

  116. ‘Sentí que tenía un propósito’: la pandemia puede mostrar otras oportunidades para el futuro en Español, April 16

    Cuando la vida se interrumpe por una crisis, algunas personas ven oportunidades (de cambio, acción, introspección) que, de otra manera, no tomarían en cuenta.

  117. The Carpenter Who Built Tiny Homes for Toronto’s Homeless Foreign, April 16

    Khaleel Seivwright built himself a wooden shanty while living on a West Coast commune. Then he started building similar lodgings for homeless people in Toronto to survive the winter.

  118. Goldman Sachs’s Top Image Maker Is Leaving Business, April 16

    Jake Siewert led the firm’s post-financial crisis reputation makeover.

  119. Booster shots and re-vaccinations could be needed. Drug companies are planning for it. National, April 16

    Pfizer’s chief executive said a third dose of the company’s Covid-19 vaccine was “likely” to be needed within a year of the initial two-dose inoculation, followed by annual vaccinations.

  120. Covid-19 Pushes India’s Middle Class Toward Poverty Business, April 16

    The pandemic sent 32 million people in India from the middle class last year. Now a second wave is threatening the dreams of millions more looking for a better life.

  121. Gauging the Prospects for International Travel Travel, April 16

    Roadblocks abound, but airlines, hotels and tour companies are trying to balance optimism with caution.

  122. Paraguay’s ‘Life and Death’ Covid Crisis Gives China Diplomatic Opening Foreign, April 16

    Paraguay desperately needs Covid-19 vaccines, which China could supply. That has led the South American nation to reconsider its relationship with Taiwan, which precludes it from dealing with Beijing.

  123. Signs of Economic Hope Are Growing, Some With Superlatives Business, April 15

    Soaring retail sales and a sharp drop in jobless claims are the latest reflection of a quickening recovery and suggest a year of remarkable growth.

  124. I’m a Virus Expert Who Got the J&J Vaccine. I’m Not Losing Sleep. Op Ed, April 15

    Here’s how to think about the federal investigation into rare but severe blood clots associated with the vaccine.

  125. Biden’s approval rating rises, helped by the vaccine distribution push. Politics, April 15

    Americans don’t think the president deserves sole credit for the widespread availability of Covid vaccines, but they like the job he’s doing getting them distributed, a new poll found.

  126. Biden’s approval rating rises, helped by the vaccine distribution push. U.S., April 15

    Americans don’t think the president deserves sole credit for the widespread availability of Covid vaccines, but they like the job he’s doing getting them distributed, a new poll found.

  127. Why Spy Agencies Say the Future Is Bleak Editorial, April 15

    Climate change, technology, disease and financial crises will pose big challenges for the world, an intelligence report concludes.

  128. States Struggle With Vaccine Pause as Federal Officials Reassure Public Washington, April 15

    Dr. Anthony S. Fauci said he hoped for a decision “quite soon” on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, as local governments shifted to more complicated two-dose vaccines for marginal populations.

  129. Should Covid Vaccines Be Mandatory? Op Ed, April 15

    Dosage supply appears on the verge of outstripping demand in some states, well before herd immunity can be reached.

  130. Weekly Health Quiz: Covid Vaccines, Virus Variants and Safer Travel Interactive, April 15

    Test your knowledge of this week’s health news.

  131. Vaccines Won’t Protect Millions of Patients With Weakened Immune Systems Science, April 15

    Many cannot produce enough infection-fighting cells to fend off the coronavirus. But researchers are testing one therapy that may help: monoclonal antibodies.

  132. Top health officials urge Americans to get vaccinated, but barely address the J. & J. pause. Live, April 15

    Injections of the Johnson & Johnson coronavirus vaccine came to a sudden halt this week in the United States after a small number of rare blood clots emerged, though it is unclear if the shot was responsible.

  133. Vaccines Won’t Protect Millions of Patients With Weakened Immune Systems Science, April 15

    Many cannot produce enough infection-fighting cells to fend off the coronavirus. But researchers are testing one therapy that may help: monoclonal antibodies.

  134. China’s Economy Is Booming. Shoppers Are Skittish Anyway. Business, April 15

    The world’s traditional growth engine reported an 18.3 percent leap in the first quarter. But consumers and small business aren’t fully sharing in the spoils.

  135. Can the Covid Vaccine Protect Me Against Virus Variants? Well, April 15

    Vaccines do a good job of protecting us from coronavirus, but fear and confusion about the rise of variants have muddled the message. Here are answers to common questions.

  136. A Glut of Available Manhattan Office Space Real Estate, April 15

    Office space available for lease is at its highest level in at least three decades, according to a recent report.

  137. Some New Yorkers Don’t Want the Superrich to Return Styles, April 15

    Sure, the tax revenue is nice. But ….

  138. Some New Yorkers Don’t Want the Superrich to Return Styles, April 15

    Sure, the tax revenue is nice. But ….

  139. The Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Pause Explained Podcasts, April 15

    Scores of appointments were canceled after the U.S. called for a halt on the use of the Johnson & Johnson shot. Here’s the story behind that decision.

  140. Week’s unemployment claims fall to lowest level of the pandemic. Business, April 15

    Applications for jobless claims have been stubbornly high for months, but reopenings have bolstered confidence in a dynamic recovery.

  141. Why My Family Is Watching ‘Gilmore Girls’ Op Ed, April 15

    The perfect refuge from Covid and cancer is a fictional town where nothing really happens and the diner is always open.

  142. U.S. Suicides Declined Over All in 2020 but May Have Risen Among People of Color Science, April 15

    Despite dire predictions, the number of suicides fell by 5 percent over all. Still, smaller studies suggested the trends were much worse among nonwhite Americans.

  143. A top politician in Japan talked of canceling the Olympics. Then he walked it back. Foreign, April 15

    A leading member of Japan’s governing party said the country might have to “completely cancel” the Games if coronavirus infections continue to surge.

  144. ¿Ya podemos dejar de limpiar todo obsesivamente? en Español, April 15

    Los CDC han reconocido lo que los científicos llevan diciendo desde hace meses: el riesgo de contraer el coronavirus a través de las superficies es bajo.

  145. C.D.C. Panel Keeps Pause on Use of J&J Vaccine, Citing Need to Assess Potential Risks Science, April 14

    An advisory committee debated the very few cases of a rare blood disorder and worried about the suspension’s effect on global needs for a one-shot, easy-to-ship vaccine.

  146. Los temores de Occidente sobre las vacunas obstaculizan el proceso de inmunización en otras partes del mundo en Español, April 15

    En medio de una profunda controversia, las advertencias occidentales sobre las vacunas AstraZeneca y Johnson & Johnson corren el riesgo de provocar una explosión de desconfianza contra las vacunas a nivel global.

  147. How Mario Draghi Is Making Italy a Power Player in Europe Foreign, April 15

    The new prime minister is leveraging his European relationships and his solid reputation to make Italy a force on the continent in a way it has not been in decades.

  148. Michigan’s governor again resists imposing new restrictions, as cases keep surging. National, April 14

    Gov. Gretchen Whitmer blamed a highly infectious variant and a lack of compliance with existing rules for the state’s alarming pandemic numbers.

  149. Anthony Audy, Vermont Tattoo Artist With Whimsical Style, Dies at 44 Obits, April 14

    A love for all things magical, spooky and cute informed the thousands of tattoos Mr. Audy inked in a 15-year career in Burlington. He died of Covid-19.

  150. Nearly half of Republicans say they don’t want a Covid vaccine, a big public health challenge. Politics, April 14

    Over half of American adults have now received at least one shot, but resistance to vaccination among Republicans remains strong, two new polls found.