T/college

  1. Megan Thee Stallion Knows ‘Tuition Ain’t No Joke’ Style, Yesterday

    The 24-year-old rapper hosted a kinder beauty pageant, with scholarship money as the prize.

  2. Forget Tanning Beds. College Students Today Want Uber Parking. Business, Yesterday

    Student housing is shifting away from recreational dazzle and toward amenities that reflect the gig economy: stronger Wi-Fi, room for collaboration and 3-D printers.

  3. Forget Tanning Beds. College Students Today Want Uber Parking. Business, Yesterday

    Student housing is shifting away from recreational dazzle and toward amenities that reflect the gig economy: stronger Wi-Fi, room for collaboration and 3-D printers.

  4. The Late Bloomer: Learning About the Birds and Bees in College Well, Yesterday

    My Orthodox Jewish education skipped sex ed, and I didn’t have “The Talk” until I was 24.

  5. Miami, Drowning and Scorching, Awaits Democrats for Debate U.S., June 24

    Activists wanted a Democratic debate focused entirely on climate change. They aren’t getting one, but in Miami this week, the issue will be inescapable.

  6. Why Harvard Was Wrong to Make Me Step Down Opinion, June 24

    Some students may have felt unsafe because I represented Harvey Weinstein. But feelings alone should not drive university policy.

  7. How E-Commerce Sites Manipulate You Into Buying Things You May Not Want Technology, June 24

    Research released this week finds that many online retailers use so-called dark patterns to influence what shoppers decide to purchase. Cracking down on the practice could be difficult.

  8. Bernie Sanders Unveils Education Plan to Eliminate Student Loan Debt U.S., June 24

    Senator Bernie Sanders, along with Representatives Ilhan Omar and Pramila Jayapal, would cancel all student debt and eliminate tuition at public and community colleges.

  9. Hats Like Sneezes, Playing at Aristocracy and Other Notes From Royal Ascot World, June 24

    An innocent went to the races, a major event on the British social calendar, in search of answers about class, nostalgia and the state of England today. She went in the wrong hat.

  10. Trump’s Immigration Plan Would Have Missed This Nobel Prize Winner Opinion, June 24

    I.I. Rabi came up with the idea behind M.R.I.s. Who brought it to fruition? A man whose family fled genocide.

  11. What Grades Mean Opinion, June 23

    A philosopher says they’re about helping students “appreciate relative degrees of success in the mastery of skills and subject matter.”

  12. Colleges That Examine the Big Questions Opinion, June 21

    A philosophy professor says students can both study Plato and get the services they need at mainstream colleges and universities.

  13. Jane Sanders and the Messy Demise of a Vermont College U.S., June 21

    The wife of Bernie Sanders had a bold plan to save Burlington College. Within six years, it was defunct, and federal prosecutors were on the case.

  14. Seeking $2.1 Million After College Chain’s Collapse (to Repay Its Guardian, Not Students) Business, June 21

    The request would eat up nearly half the cash left at Dream Center Education Holdings, the chain that ran Argosy University and the Art Institutes.

  15. When ISIS Killed Cyclists on Their Journey Around the World The Weekly, June 21

    Watch our new TV show from The New York Times on FX and Hulu

  16. The World’s Lamest Trojan Horse Opinion, June 20

    If Beijing truly wants to orchestrate an influence campaign among Chinese students in America, it needs to step up its game.

  17. Black Leaders Denounce Juul’s $7.5 Million Gift to Medical School Health, June 19

    Juul is giving Meharry Medical College, a historically black institution, money for a research center that will study, among other things, Juul.

  18. Feeling Lost After Graduation? Make a Map Style, June 19

    You don’t have to know exactly where you’re headed, but it helps to have a sense of direction.

  19. Autistic Boy Was Forced to Leave a Church. He Got an Apology. World, June 19

    When Paul Rimmer took his son to a service at King’s Chapel in Cambridge, England, an usher asked them to leave. Mr. Rimmer’s letter to the dean went viral, with many parents sharing similar stories.

  20. Reparations Are Rare in America, but They Have Been Paid Before U.S., June 19

    With a renewed focus on reparations for slavery, what lessons can be drawn from payments to victims of other historical injustices in America?

  21. Reparations Are Rare in America, but They Have Been Paid Before U.S., June 19

    With a renewed focus on reparations for slavery, what lessons can be drawn from payments to victims of other historical injustices in America?

  22. College Essays Should Be Personal. For School-Shooting Survivors, the Question Is How Personal. U.S., June 19

    A generation of American students has become tragically familiar with mass shootings. Many of them describe the life-changing experiences in their college applications.

  23. The Evangelical, the ‘Pool Boy,’ the Comedian and Michael Cohen U.S., June 18

    Jerry Falwell Jr. defied expectations when he supported Donald J. Trump in 2016. Now details are emerging about behind-the-scenes maneuvering before the endorsement.

  24. Surviving a Mass Shooting, and Writing About It: We Want to Hear From You Reader Center, June 18

    We’re interested in hearing from students who have written college admission essays about surviving a mass shooting.

  25. The Kyle Kashuv Case: Was Harvard Right to Revoke Admission? Opinion, June 18

    Readers, invoking moral character and mercy, disagree about the revocation of a Parkland student’s admission.

  26. Dr. Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, Scrutinizer of Aging, Dies at 84 Health, June 18

    Dr. Barrett-Connor founded and led an important long-term study on aging, using both men and women as subjects — an unusual method at the time.

  27. Meet Australia’s New Sex-Changing Tomato: Solanum Plastisexum World, June 18

    A plant that grows in the country’s north has been found to exhibit an unpredictable sexual identity, challenging the idea of reproductive norms for other living things.

  28. Harvard’s False Path to Wisdom Opinion, June 17

    Sometimes sin is an opportunity for redemption.

  29. Racist Comments Cost Conservative Parkland Student a Place at Harvard U.S., June 17

    The student, Kyle Kashuv, a recent graduate of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, had repeatedly used racial slurs in a written chat with classmates when he was 16.

  30. Why Bernie Sanders Isn’t Afraid of ‘Socialism’ Opinion, June 17

    His economic project and his political project are indistinguishable.

  31. 6 Ways New Rent Laws Will Affect New Yorkers New York, June 17

    Monday: More apartments will stay regulated, with stricter limits on rent increases.

  32. California Tests a Digital ‘Fire Alarm’ for Mental Distress Health, June 17

    The state is teaming up with Silicon Valley to make mental health services more available. Promises abound, and so do potential problems.

  33. Elizabeth Warren Is Completely Serious Magazine, June 17

    About income inequality. About corporate power. About corrupt politics. And about being America’s next president.

  34. Visa Delays at Backlogged Immigration Service Strand International Students U.S., June 16

    The Citizenship and Immigration Services agency has increased processing times for applications from international students seeking summer jobs, leaving hundreds stranded.

  35. Oberlin Helped Students Defame a Bakery, a Jury Says. The Punishment: $33 Million. U.S., June 14

    A libel case against the university has raised questions about how much a college should get involved with the protests of its students.

  36. So Long, Exoplanet HD 17156b. Hello ... Sauron? Science, June 14

    Astronomers have announced a global contest to rename dozens of extrasolar planets. The nominees are pouring in.

  37. Eager to Limit Exemptions to Vaccination, States Face Staunch Resistance Health, June 14

    Legislators trying to curb the numbers of unvaccinated children have been met with vigorous opposition from upset parents.

  38. Bringing Up Robot Baby, a Teenage Rite of Passage New York, June 14

    Students around the country take home the infant simulators, with little evidence that they reduce pregnancy.

  39. Bringing Up Robot Baby, a Teenage Rite of Passage New York, June 14

    Students around the country take home the infant simulators, with little evidence that they reduce pregnancy.

  40. Stanford Team Aims at Alexa and Siri With a Privacy-Minded Alternative Technology, June 14

    A handful of companies already dominate the market for digital assistants. The implications for consumer privacy are a serious concern, researchers say.

  41. Republicans Once Supported Fetal Tissue Research. Not Anymore. Opinion, June 13

    Even the ultraconservative Strom Thurmond backed it. What happened?

  42. Dr. Henry Lynch, 91, Dies; Found Hereditary Link in Cancer Science, June 13

    To a doubting medical world, he found compelling evidence that some cancers are passed along genetically. His work was ultimately widely embraced.

  43. These Animal Migrations Are Huge — and Invisible Science, June 13

    Swarms of insects move across continents each year. Scientists used radar to track one species and discovered a vast ecological force.

  44. How Much Nature Is Enough? 120 Minutes a Week, Doctors Say Health, June 13

    Researchers have now quantified the ideal amount of time needed to reap the health benefits of the great outdoors.

  45. Death to the Meritocracy with Andrew Yang Opinion, June 13

    The 2020 contender talks Trump, jobs and higher education.

  46. Martin Feldstein, 79, a Chief Economist Under Reagan, Dies U.S., June 12

    He took a leave from Harvard to be chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers and, as a deficit hawk, never shied from challenging his White House colleagues.

  47. Former U.C.L.A. Gynecologist Charged With Sexual Battery U.S., June 12

    Dr. James Heaps, a longtime gynecologist at the school’s student health center, was the subject of four allegations of sexual misconduct, the university found.

  48. College Admissions Scandal: No Prison Time for Former Stanford Coach U.S., June 12

    The first sentencing in the scandal raised questions about culpability in the case and the role of universities, who have been described as victims.

  49. Stanford Coach Avoids Prison in Admissions Scandal. Have Colleges Avoided Blame? U.S., June 12

    The first sentencing in the scandal raised questions about culpability in the case and the role of universities, who have been described by prosecutors as victims.

  50. Biden Leads New Nevada Poll, as Warren Surpasses Sanders U.S., June 12

    A Monmouth University poll of voters in Nevada, a key early-voting state, showed only three candidates polling in the double digits.

  51. Warren Surpasses Sanders in Nevada Poll, Trailing Only Biden in 2020 Field U.S., June 12

    Meanwhile, Gov. Steve Bullock of Montana appears to have been shut out of the first Democratic debate after failing to pick up 1 percent support in the survey.

  52. Who Needs the Humanities When You Have Jair Bolsonaro? Opinion, June 12

    Brazil’s education system is being strangled by a president who doesn’t believe in learning.

  53. The Meritocracy Is Under Siege Opinion, June 12

    Are we merely reproducing privilege or is there something to salvage in the system we have now?

  54. Poughkeepsie, N.Y.: A Postindustrial City Ready for Its Revival Real Estate, June 12

    This Hudson River city, where manufacturing once thrived, is eager to join the upstate boom. And housing prices are slowly creeping up.

  55. Living In ... Poughkeepsie, N.Y. Slideshow, June 12

    This Hudson River city, where manufacturing once thrived, is eager to join the upstate boom. And housing prices are slowly creeping up.

  56. A Reality Check for Sea Ranch Arts, June 11

    Demographic shifts. Climate change. The internet. “Sea Ranch is changing, like our society,” said the architect Mary Griffin. “We simply can’t build the way we did even 20 years ago.”

  57. Wearing Their Hearts on Their Graduation Caps Reader Center, June 11

    Members of the class of 2019 share the inspiration behind their decorated mortarboards.

  58. Trump’s Competition for Most Unpopular Politician in New York: de Blasio New York, June 10

    A statewide poll suggests that President Trump is better liked than Mayor Bill de Blasio, who has become more unpopular since declaring his 2020 candidacy.

  59. Three Created a Fertility Revolution With I.V.F., but One, a Woman, Went Unrecognized World, June 10

    Newly released papers show that Robert Edwards, who won a Nobel Prize, tried in vain to have Jean Purdy recognized as an equal partner in the breakthrough.

  60. Solving a Boomtown Mystery Opinion, June 10

    Why are some small towns thriving?

  61. Jury Finds Oberlin College Libeled a Bakery and Awards $11 Million in Damages U.S., June 10

    The verdict raised questions about the responsibility of colleges to police students’ speech and behavior, as well as broader First Amendment issues.

  62. To Map a Coral Reef, Peel Back the Seawater Science, June 10

    This scientist couple created an airborne observatory to map tropical forests. Now they’re using it to identify threatened reefs.

  63. She Left the Education Dept. for Groups It Curbed. Now She’s Back, With Plans. U.S., June 9

    As the architect of higher education policy, Diane Auer Jones is pushing to overhaul accreditation, and, to critics, revive the fortunes of “bottom feeder” for-profit colleges.

  64. The Anti-College Is on the Rise Opinion, June 8

    Students, teachers and reformers are pushing back against the failures of mainstream higher education.

  65. Happy Anniversary, Economy! (Maybe. Sort of. On Second Thought … ) Business, June 8

    The U.S. economic expansion will be the longest in its history if there is no recession by July 1. But we won’t know for sure for months. Or years.

  66. New Generation of Student Activists Has a Message for Colleges: Do Better U.S., June 8

    Protesters of sexual assault across the country have focused on their schools, using similar tactics and winning major concessions.

  67. The Elderly Are Getting Complex Surgeries. Often It Doesn’t End Well. Health, June 7

    Complication rates are high among the oldest patients. Now a surgeons’ group will propose standards for hospitals operating on the elderly.

  68. Robert Earle, 93, TV ‘College Bowl’ Moderator, Is Dead Obituaries, June 7

    In the 1960s he was the man asking tough questions to teams of college students in a fast-paced test of knowledge.

  69. University of Alabama Returns Largest-Ever Gift to Donor U.S., June 7

    Tensions had publicly bubbled up in recent weeks, with Hugh F. Culverhouse Jr. reportedly dictating how he wanted his $21.5 million donation spent.

  70. Bulletin Board Education, June 7

    Graduation guidance, e-learning around the globe, a scholarship program for refugees — and more. A collection of views and news from a special report on Learning.

  71. From Albania to Singapore, U.S. Students Look for Tailored Experiences Abroad Education, June 7

    More students in the United States are studying overseas, and colleges now offer a variety of experiences that let students choose what they want.

  72. The New School’s Leader on Global Goals and What Lies Ahead Education, June 7

    David Van Zandt. the university’s president, on the importance of reaching students outside the United States.

  73. Short-Term Programs for Long-Term Success Education, June 7

    A growing number of intensive programs offered online, or on campuses around the world, can help workers at all stages become more globally minded.

  74. Online Classrooms Look to Improve Higher Education Across Africa, but Face Skepticism Education, June 7

    New ventures hope to fill a need as the number of African high school graduates grows, along with demand for a more highly skilled work force.

  75. From Instability at Home to Study Overseas Education, June 7

    These students “have a level of grit that students who have not been through similar experiences probably don’t have.”

  76. Dispute Arises Over ‘No-No Boy,’ a Classic of Asian-American Literature With a Complex History Books, June 6

    John Okada’s 1957 novel about a Japanese-American draft resister has been republished by Penguin Classics, raising questions over its ownership.

  77. An Australian Doctor’s Dream: Curing America’s Opioid Curse World, June 6

    Dr. George O’Neil has implanted a device he invented into thousands of Australians who abuse opioids. But is it an answer for America’s addiction crisis?

  78. The Case Against Hope Opinion, June 6

    I’m not trying to depress anyone — especially recent graduates — but things are really bad, and what we need to do is act.

  79. Linda Fairstein, Once Cheered, Faces Storm After ‘When They See Us’ Arts, June 6

    A Netflix series about the Central Park jogger case has led to intense criticism of the famous prosecutor-turned-novelist who oversaw the investigation.

  80. Trump Administration Sharply Curtails Fetal Tissue Medical Research U.S., June 5

    The Trump administration will be ending a major university contract involving fetal tissue research and will soon stop such work at the National Institutes of Health.

  81. Trump Administration Sharply Curtails Fetal Tissue Medical Research U.S., June 5

    The Trump administration will be ending a major university contract involving fetal tissue research and will soon stop such work at the National Institutes of Health.

  82. Who Were the Ancestors of Native Americans? A Lost People in Siberia, Scientists Say Science, June 5

    Genetic analysis of ancient teeth and bones suggests Native Americans largely descend from a vanished group called the Ancient Paleo-Siberians.

  83. Even One Extra Walk a Day May Make a Big Difference Well, June 5

    For older women, walking as few as 4,500 steps a day reduced mortality compared with those who took only 2,700 steps a day.

  84. There Are Better Ways to Do College Opinion, June 4

    Work colleges teach students that communities need all their members to pick up a shovel and participate.

  85. Come for the Deep-Sea Selfies. Stay to Learn About Sustainability. Arts, June 4

    “Ocean Cube,” an exhibition of five Instagramable dreamlike rooms, offers commentary on pollution.

  86. He Was Looking for Opals. Instead He Found a New Dinosaur Species. World, June 4

    Scientists reported the discovery in Australia of a plant-eating species, 35 years after a miner brought fossils to a museum in Sydney.

  87. Lawrence Leathers, Jazz Drummer on Grammy-Winning Albums, Found Dead After Assault New York, June 3

    Mr. Leathers, 37, was a rising talent on New York’s straight-ahead jazz scene and had played on two Grammy-winning albums.

  88. At the Supreme Court, Justice Thomas Scoffs at Retirement Rumors U.S., June 3

    In a relaxed public interview, Justice Clarence Thomas reflected on his career and work at the Supreme Court.

  89. At the Supreme Court, Justice Thomas Scoffs at Retirement Rumors U.S., June 3

    In a relaxed public interview, Justice Clarence Thomas reflected on his career and work at the Supreme Court.

  90. Trump’s Tariffs Could Nullify Tax Cut, Clouding Economic Picture Business, June 3

    President Trump’s plans to increase tariffs on imports from Mexico and China would wipe out the benefits of his signature tax cuts for the poorest Americans, analyses show.

  91. Juliann Bluitt Foster, Trailblazer in Dentistry, Is Dead at 80 Obituaries, June 3

    Just 2 percent of dentists were women when she joined their ranks, and “maybe 2 percent of that 2 percent” were black. She made it her goal to change that.

  92. ‘The Weekly’ Series Premiere: T.M. Landry School Sold Top Colleges a ‘Sob Story’ That Wasn’t True U.S., June 3

    A new TV series from The New York Times is now on FX and Hulu.

  93. How a Reporter Speaks to Women About Their Most Personal Experiences Times Insider, June 3

    Pam Belluck, a science reporter for The Times, recently discussed her reporting on surgical advancements for women who have experienced female genital cutting.

  94. Abuse at the Landry School: You Helped Us Heal Opinion, June 3

    A mother who, along with her son, was featured in The New York Times’s new TV show expresses her gratitude.

  95. Biggest Offender in Outsize Debt: Graduate Schools The Upshot, June 3

    The market for master’s degrees behaves in strange and erratic ways, new data reveals.

  96. When Defending Vaccines Gets Ugly Opinion, June 2

    Dr. Peter Hotez has devoted his career to making vaccines more widely available. He routinely gets attacked for it.

  97. F.B.I. Is Said to Be Investigating College Admissions Practices at T.M. Landry U.S., June 2

    The private school in Louisiana, once celebrated for helping underprivileged and minority students attend elite colleges, is now under federal investigation over its college applications.

  98. ‘He’s a Good Man’: Jim Jordan Finds Support at Home in Ohio State Abuse Scandal U.S., June 2

    An investigation at Ohio State University revealed that coaches had inklings of a team doctor’s sexual abuse. But Representative Jim Jordan’s denials are assuaging his constituents.

  99. Former N.F.L. Player Keith Mumphery, After Settling Lawsuit, Plots a Comeback Sports, June 1

    Cleared, then convicted of relationship violence in absentia, then cut from the N.F.L., Mumphery has once again been cleared. Now he needs a job.

  100. Fairy-Tale College Applications U.S., June 1

    A school made headlines for sending black students to elite campuses, but it was too good to be true.

  101. Fact-Checking Elizabeth Warren on the Campaign Trail U.S., June 1

    The Massachusetts senator has emphasized her wealth tax on millionaires and defended her past stance on marijuana. Here’s a fact check.

  102. LaSalle Leffall Jr., 89, Dies; Cancer Society’s First Black Leader Obituaries, May 31

    A prominent surgeon and Howard University professor, he promoted awareness of the risks of cancer, particularly among African-Americans.

  103. ‘Screen Time’ Is Over Health, May 31

    The phrase can’t remotely capture our ever-shifting digital experience, social scientists say. Say hello to the “screenome.”

  104. A Financial Checklist for Your Newly Minted High School Graduate Your Money, May 31

    We’ve got budget, retirement account, credit, information security and insurance advice for your independent adult, college student, gap-year taker or future soldier.

  105. ‘The Weekly’ Wants to Show You That ‘Reporters Are Not Robots’ Reader Center, May 31

    A new TV show from The Times places journalists’ expertise — and their inner conflicts — center stage.

  106. Louisiana School Scandal: The Truth Behind Students’ Viral Videos The Weekly, May 31

    The TV series premiere from The New York Times on FX and Hulu.

  107. Trump’s Crackdown on Illegal Immigration: 11 Employers Prosecuted in the Past Year U.S., May 31

    A total of 11 employers have been prosecuted for hiring undocumented workers over the past 12 months.

  108. Can Californians Still Find a Path to Mobility at the State’s Universities? Opinion, May 30

    As a counter to staggering inequality, the system needs to be more open to the people who actually live in the Golden State.

  109. DeepMind Can Now Beat Us at Multiplayer Games, Too Science, May 30

    Chess and Go were child’s play. Now A.I. is winning at capture the flag. Will such skills translate to the real world?

  110. Listen to What Doctors, in a Time of ‘Crisis,’ Said Behind Closed Doors U.S., May 30

    Secret audio recordings provide an unfiltered look inside a children’s hospital where physicians warned that more patients seemed to fare poorly after heart surgery.

  111. Doctors Were Alarmed: ‘Would I Have My Children Have Surgery Here?’ Interactive, May 30

    Secret recordings captured physicians’ concerns that more children seemed to fare poorly after heart surgery. Their hospital kept doing the operations.

  112. Missing Millions Put an American-Funded Afghan College Under Scrutiny World, May 30

    The American University of Afghanistan is at risk of closing after United States government investigators said they could not account for $63 million in spending.

  113. 37 More Former Ohio State Athletes Sue the University in Sexual Abuse Case Sports, May 29

    The lawsuit is the fourth of its kind filed against the university and the first since Ohio State released a report detailing how a former team doctor repeatedly assaulted males athletes.

  114. Hillary Clinton, in Graduation Speech, Calls for Renewed Focus on Russian Interference U.S., May 29

    Speaking at Hunter College commencement in New York City, Mrs. Clinton urged Americans to confront Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

  115. Colleges Challenge a Common Protection in Sexual Assault Lawsuits: Anonymity U.S., May 29

    Efforts to publicly disclose the identities of women suing universities represent a more aggressive approach toward students, lawyers said.

  116. So You’re Back at Home for the Summer … Style, May 28

    A survival guide for spending the summer at your parents’ house.

  117. The Eclipse That Made Einstein Famous Science, May 28

    Before 1919, cosmology was as subjective as art history. A solar eclipse, and a patent clerk’s equations, changed everything.

  118. The Reason You Hate Online Ads Opinion, May 28

    The algorithms know what we’ll do, but not why we do it. At least not yet.

  119. 4 Years of College, $0 in Debt: How Some Countries Make Higher Education Affordable Reader Center, May 28

    When we asked people around the world what sort of financial burden they bore for their higher education, we heard how much it varies from country to country.

  120. Give Low-Income Students a Tax Break Opinion, May 27

    An education nonprofit says the tax on non-tuition college assistance is a poor reflection of our country’s values.