T/college

  1. Black Columbia Student’s Confrontation With Security Becomes Flashpoint Over Racism on Campus New York, Yesterday

    A video of Alexander McNab being pinned down by security officers is adding to a broader conversation about how students of color are treated at one of the nation’s most prominent universities.

  2. ‘Tell Them Who You Tortured’: Gina Haspel Faces a Heckler, and Her Past U.S., Yesterday

    Ms. Haspel, the C.I.A. director, was confronted during a speech by a man shouting about her role in torturing suspected militants in the years after the Sept. 11 attacks.

  3. This Genetic Mutation Makes People Feel Full — All the Time Health, Yesterday

    Two new studies confirm that weight control is often the result of genetics, not willpower.

  4. The Lifesaving Power in Stem Cells Well, Yesterday

    Liars and thieves should not be allowed to detract from legitimate scientific research that has made umbilical cord blood mystic in its regenerative powers.

  5. He Listed a T. Rex Fossil on eBay for $2.95 Million. Scientists Weren’t Thrilled. Science, April 17

    “I own this thing,” Alan Detrich recalled telling a museum director. “It is mine. I can do whatever I want.”

  6. For Refugee Children, Reading Helps Heal Trauma Opinion, April 17

    Psychologists find that story time can build the strong relationships they need for healthy development.

  7. ‘Partly Alive’: Scientists Revive Cells in Brains From Dead Pigs Science, April 17

    In a study that upends assumptions about brain death, researchers brought some cells back to life — or something like it.

  8. Felicity Huffman Should Get Prison Time in Admissions Scandal, Prosecutors Say U.S., April 16

    Prosecutors plan to argue that Ms. Huffman’s part in the college admissions scheme fits a sentencing guideline of four to 10 months of incarceration.

  9. Stanford Clears Professor of Helping With Gene-Edited Babies Experiment Health, April 16

    Stephen Quake and two colleagues were found to have followed proper scientific protocol in their interactions with the Chinese researcher who did the work.

  10. Notre Dame, the University, Was Once Devastated by Fire, Too U.S., April 16

    Workers were making repairs to the roof of Notre Dame on a fine April day. A fire broke out, too high to be quickly doused with water. That happened 140 years ago, in Indiana.

  11. #WhatsMyName Stresses Safety for Uber Riders Business, April 16

    A South Carolina student was murdered after getting into a car she mistook for her Uber, underscoring the safety risks of ride-hailing apps.

  12. How to Cover 2020: Assume Nothing and Beware of Twitter Business, April 16

    Political journalists gathered in Chicago to discuss the mistakes of 2016 and how to avoid them the next time around.

  13. Biden, at Hollings Funeral, Talks About How ‘People Can Change’ U.S., April 16

    Mr. Biden once called Fritz Hollings his best friend in the Senate, strengthening his connection to the state, which is pivotal in the Democratic primary.

  14. Anti-Zionists Deserve Free Speech Opinion, April 15

    The Trump administration bars a critic of Israel from America.

  15. Faith Politics on the Rise as Indonesian Islam Takes a Hard-Line Path World, April 15

    Before the presidential vote this week, Indonesian candidates are polishing their religious credentials to appeal to a growing conservative populace.

  16. Fordham Student Dies After Fall From Bell Tower New York, April 14

    A 22-year-old senior died Sunday evening, hours after falling from a tower known to attract thrill-seeking students at the university’s Bronx campus.

  17. Fordham Student, Sydney Monfries, Dies After Fall From Campus Bell Tower New York, April 14

    Ms. Monfries, a 22-year-old senior, died Sunday evening, hours after falling from a tower known to attract thrill-seeking students at the university’s Bronx campus.

  18. Morehouse College, a Traditionally Black All-Male School, Says It Will Accept Transgender Men U.S., April 14

    The policy, which was announced on Saturday, will continue to ban from enrollment women anyone who identifies as a woman.

  19. Possible Hazing Episode Causes SUNY Buffalo to Suspend Fraternity and Sorority Activities Automobiles, April 14

    An 18-year-old student, Sebastian Serafin-Bazan, ended up in critical condition at an area hospital after going into cardiac arrest.

  20. Possible Hazing Episode Causes SUNY Buffalo to Suspend Fraternity and Sorority Activities New York, April 14

    An 18-year-old student, Sebastian Serafin-Bazan, ended up in critical condition at an area hospital after going into cardiac arrest.

  21. Pete Buttigieg’s Focus: Storytelling First. Policy Details Later. U.S., April 14

    In his writings as a student and young politician, he fixated on the kind of media narratives that have propelled his 2020 campaign.

  22. Gene-Edited Babies: What a Chinese Scientist Told an American Mentor Health, April 14

    Stanford is investigating Stephen Quake’s interactions with He Jiankui, the scientist who performed the controversial experiment.

  23. Doctors Use Electrical Implant to Aid Brain-Damaged Woman Health, April 13

    A pilot study offers “a very promising start” in the effort to help people recover from traumatic brain injuries.

  24. That First Black Hole Seen in an Image Is Now Called Pōwehi, at Least in Hawaii Science, April 13

    The word, which means “adorned fathomless dark creation,” is derived from the Kumulipo, a centuries-old Hawaiian creation chant, said a professor who helped with the naming.

  25. Beloved Composer: The Week in Classical Music Arts, April 13

    George Crumb at 90, the opening of the Shed, and a new album of David Sanford's music were among the highlights.

  26. James Winn, 71, Dryden Biographer and a Skilled Flutist, Dies Obituaries, April 12

    Whether he was writing a Restoration period biography or a book on war poetry, his background in music informed his approach.

  27. Brigham Young Students Value Their Strict Honor Code. But Not the Harsh Punishments. U.S., April 12

    The voices of young people with different views of social justice are pushing the Mormon Church to modernize.

  28. A New Rx for Diabetes: Lighten Up Health, April 12

    In older patients, rigorous lowering of blood sugar may offer few benefits and pose unexpected risks.

  29. Donald Stewart, 80, Dies; Took Over the College Board at a Crucial Time Obituaries, April 12

    He favored high standards for college applicants and programs to help minority students meet those standards. Earlier he had helped revive Spelman College.

  30. Forrest Gregg, Iron Man Lineman for Lombardi’s Packers, Dies at 85 Obituaries, April 12

    An All-Pro on championship teams and a Hall of Famer, he powered Green Bay’s turf-churning “sweep.” He was later a head coach of three N.F.L. teams.

  31. Murders by Intimate Partners Are on the Rise, Study Finds U.S., April 12

    Killings at the hand of a partner rose by 19 percent from 2014 to 2017, with gun violence a driving factor, researchers at Northeastern University found.

  32. Georgetown Students Agree to Create Reparations Fund U.S., April 12

    The university’s students voted to pay a bit more tuition each semester to create a fund to benefit the descendants of slaves the school once owned.

  33. Georgetown Students Agree to Create Reparations Fund U.S., April 12

    Students voted to pay a bit more tuition each semester to create a fund to benefit the descendants of slaves that were sold to keep the school afloat.

  34. College Tour Road Trips as Routes to Adulthood Well, April 12

    College visits can be a chance for parents to start thinking of their kids in a more grown-up light.

  35. Standardized Test Companies Scramble to Fix Weaknesses After College Admissions Scandal U.S., April 12

    The College Board said it would crack down on requests from students to take tests at schools other than their own.

  36. As Test Expert in Admissions Scandal Pleads Guilty, Exam Companies Move to Fix Weaknesses U.S., April 12

    The College Board said it would crack down on requests from students to take tests at schools other than their own.

  37. An Artist Rises, and Brings a Generation With Him Arts, April 12

    In a struggling neighborhood with a vibrant history, Titus Kaphar found a home for himself. Now he’s creating a center there to nurture emerging artists.

  38. Lorraine Branham, Journalism Dean and Mentor, Dies at 66 Obituaries, April 11

    As the first woman and first person of color to lead the Newhouse School at Syracuse, she helped students and faculty embrace the future — and diversity.

  39. Donald Trump Called Upstate New York a ‘Ghost Town.’ Here’s Life Among the Ghosts. New York, April 11

    Manufacturers like the Carrier Corporation abandoned Syracuse ages ago. So the locals turned to each other for strength amid the chaos.

  40. Keep the Federal Reserve I Love Alive Business, April 11

    The economist N. Gregory Mankiw says he loves the central bank but fears for its future as one of America’s great institutions.

  41. Biden, Despite Troubles, Tops Democratic Contenders in Poll of Iowa Voters U.S., April 11

    The poll, conducted by Monmouth University, also indicated that support for Mayor Pete Buttigieg is on the rise.

  42. ‘ZooMass’ No More, UMass Crashes the Men’s Frozen Four Sports, April 10

    Led by the star defenseman Cale Makar and Coach Greg Carvel, the Minutemen are in the national semifinals for the first time.

  43. Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman: 1 Scandal, 2 Actresses, Diverging Paths U.S., April 10

    Among the dozens of parents swept up in the college admissions case were two Hollywood actresses. Their stories are very different.

  44. Michigan State Discouraged Reporting of Rape Allegation Against Athletes, Woman Says Sports, April 10

    A woman who accused three basketball players and sued the university speaks publicly about her case for the first time.

  45. Michigan State Discouraged Reporting of Rape Allegation Against Athletes, Woman Says Sports, April 10

    A woman who accused three basketball players and sued the university speaks publicly about her case for the first time.

  46. Charles Van Doren, a Quiz Show Whiz Who Wasn’t, Dies at 93 Obituaries, April 10

    A charismatic and well-pedigreed contestant, he confessed to Congress that his ballyhooed TV performances in the 1950s had been scandalously rigged.

  47. Darkness Visible, Finally: Astronomers Capture First Ever Image of a Black Hole Science, April 10

    Astronomers at last have captured a picture of one of the most secretive entities in the cosmos.

  48. Texas Tech Medical School, Under Pressure From Education Dept., Will Stop Using Race in Admissions U.S., April 9

    The university made the decision as part of an agreement resolving a 14-year investigation by the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights.

  49. Lori Loughlin Faces New Charge in College Admissions Scandal U.S., April 9

    Federal prosecutors indicted the actress and her husband, the designer Mossimo Giannulli, and 14 other parents on mail fraud and money laundering charges on Tuesday.

  50. Lori Loughlin and 15 Others Face New Charges in College Admissions Scandal U.S., April 9

    Federal prosecutors indicted the actress and her husband, the designer Mossimo Giannulli, as well as other parents on mail fraud and money laundering charges on Tuesday.

  51. 2 Arrested in Vandalism of Slave Memorial at University of North Carolina U.S., April 8

    The memorial was defaced with racial slurs and urine.

  52. People Can Savage Social Norms, but Also Revive Them Opinion, April 8

    Individuals can change the way we see.

  53. Making College Accessible Opinion, April 8

    The founder of a nonprofit discusses inequities in public education.

  54. Felicity Huffman to Plead Guilty in College Admissions Scandal U.S., April 8

    Ms. Huffman is the best-known figure to admit wrongdoing in the investigation, which found faked test scores, phony athletic credentials and big payments.

  55. Felicity Huffman and 13 Others to Plead Guilty in College Admissions Scandal U.S., April 8

    Ms. Huffman is the best-known figure to admit wrongdoing in the investigation, which found faked test scores, phony athletic credentials and big payments.

  56. To Improve Memory, Tune It Like an Orchestra Health, April 8

    A noninvasive technique shows promise in improving the working memory of older adults. But, the scientists note, “Do not try this at home!”

  57. In Bubbles, She Sees a Mathematical Universe Science, April 8

    For Karen Uhlenbeck, winner of the Abel Prize for math, a whimsical phenomenon offers a window onto higher dimensions.

  58. Players Hold Power Over the N.C.A.A., if They Feel the Hunger Sports, April 8

    College athletes, who have had to settle for hollow victories in court, have the leverage to overhaul a system of sham amateurism and reap their share of the riches they bring.

  59. Affirmative Action: Personal Stories Opinion, April 6

    Readers discuss an article tracing the lives of some black students who were admitted to Columbia in 1969.

  60. Education Department Has Stalled on Debt Relief for Defrauded Students U.S., April 5

    The Education Department failed to approve a single application for student loan relief in the second half of last year, according to new data, defying court orders.

  61. Harvard Is Investigating Fencing Coach for Sale of Home to Prospective Student’s Father U.S., April 5

    The inquiry comes as universities around the country are embroiled in a sweeping admissions scandal.

  62. A Top Lawyer Will Plead Guilty in the College-Admissions Scandal Business, April 5

    Gordon Caplan, a former co-chairman of the firm Willkie Farr, was charged with paying $75,000 to help his daughter get into college.

  63. Sydel Silverman, 85, Dies; Defended Anthropology in Academia Obituaries, April 5

    As a scholar, teacher and historian at the City University of New York, she was an ardent preservationist and an inclusive ethnographer.

  64. Prosecutors Sometimes Behave Badly. Now They May Be Held to Account. New York, April 5

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York approved landmark legislation creating a commission to investigate misconduct by prosecutors. District attorneys vowed to fight it in court.

  65. Beyond Biden: How Close Is Too Close? Health, April 4

    Psychologists have studied personal space and physical contact for decades. Here's why people get so uncomfortable.

  66. A Reporter Walks Into a Bar … and Meets a Jazz Musician Who Can Riff on Affirmative Action Reader Center, April 4

    While researching a project on college admissions during the early years of affirmative action, I visited a bar called Paris Blues in Harlem. Turns out, I had come to the right place, and found the right person.

  67. How to Cure the New Senioritis? Make Yourself Your Senior Project Well, April 4

    The end of senior year is now often characterized by a sense of purposelessness. Here are five ways high school seniors can connect with what matters to them.

  68. They Thought It Was Their Uber. But the Driver Was a Predator. U.S., April 4

    A South Carolina college student was killed last weekend by a man posing as a ride-share driver, the police said. Across the country, women have reported dozens of similar attacks in recent years.

  69. The Price for ‘Predatory’ Publishing? $50 Million Science, April 3

    The Federal Trade Commission accused Omics International, a publisher in India, of operating hundreds of questionable scientific journals. A federal judge agreed.

  70. A Robotics Team Built a Toddler a Wheelchair. Now He’s Chasing His Corgis Around. U.S., April 3

    Cillian Jackson, a 2-year-old with a genetic condition that makes mobility difficult, is now on the move thanks to a high school robotics team in his Minnesota hometown.

  71. Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin Face Court as College Scandal Rewrites Parents’ Lives U.S., April 3

    Some of the 33 parents who are charged in the college admissions scandal have lost jobs, had book contracts canceled and television shows scrapped.

  72. Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin Face Court as College Scandal Rewrites Parents’ Lives U.S., April 3

    Some of the 33 parents who are charged in the college admissions scandal have lost jobs, had book contracts canceled and television shows scrapped.

  73. Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin Appear in Court as College Admissions Scandal Rewrites Lives U.S., April 3

    Some of the 33 parents who are charged in the college admissions scandal have lost jobs, had book contracts canceled and television shows scrapped.

  74. She Survived a Slave Ship, the Civil War and the Depression. Her Name Was Redoshi. U.S., April 3

    New research suggests that Redoshi, who became a free woman in 1865, may have been the last living survivor of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

  75. What’s Life Like as a Student at U.S.C.? Depends on the Size of the Bank Account U.S., April 3

    As U.S.C. has fought to attract low-income students, the campus has become a vivid microcosm of the economic disparities in Los Angeles.

  76. College Students: Send Us Your 100-Word Love Stories Style, April 2

    This year’s Modern Love college essay contest expands by going small and seeking all the (tiny) love that’s fit to print.

  77. Two Students Charged After Protesting Border Patrol Event at University of Arizona U.S., April 2

    The students were charged with misdemeanors related to what the university called a “disturbance” at a presentation Border Patrol officers were giving in a campus building.

  78. Why Learn Another Language? Here’s Why Opinion, April 2

    Readers stress the importance of language study.

  79. With All-Boy Choirs Up for Debate, an Ensemble Soars Arts, April 2

    The storied Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, performed for the last time in America under Stephen Cleobury, its leader since 1982.

  80. Humanities Endowment Announces New Grants Amid Old Threats Arts, April 2

    The National Endowment for the Humanities announced grants supporting 233 projects around the country, two weeks after the latest effort to close the agency.

  81. Slave Owners’ Names Are on Dorms at a SUNY School. That’s Changing. New York, April 2

    Five dormitories and the dining hall at SUNY New Paltz in New York will feature Native American names instead of the town’s slave-owning founders.

  82. University of North Carolina Memorial to Slaves Is Defaced With Urine and Racial Slurs U.S., April 1

    The school said one vandal had ties to a group called Heirs to the Confederacy. More than six months ago, protesters toppled a Confederate statue nearby.

  83. It’s Possible Leggings Are the Future. Deal With It. Fashion, April 1

    Last week they set off a firestorm at the University of Notre Dame. Why does this item of clothing get people so riled up?

  84. College Student Samantha Josephson Found Dead After She Got Into a Car She Mistook for Her Uber, Police Say U.S., March 30

    Nathaniel D. Rowland, 24, was arrested in connection with the death of Samantha Josephson, 21, in South Carolina. The authorities did not disclose a motive or how she died.

  85. A Timeline of Key Supreme Court Cases on Affirmative Action U.S., March 30

    The Supreme Court has weighed in on affirmative action several times. Here are some key cases through the decades.

  86. 50 Years of Affirmative Action: What Went Right, and What It Got Wrong U.S., March 30

    A look back through the decades shows the successes and challenges of a divisive social policy.

  87. Former University of Oklahoma President Faces Sexual Misconduct Allegations U.S., March 29

    A former university student said Mr. Boren, an ex-governor and United States senator, made unwanted sexual advances. Mr. Boren has denied the allegation.

  88. Elite Colleges Announce Record Low Admission Rates in Wake of College Cheating Scandal U.S., March 29

    It is harder than ever to get into the nation’s most selective universities. The news was troubling for many as the federal cheating case continues.

  89. Roam the Spectrum With Tyshawn Sorey Arts, March 29

    In a concert at Miller Theater, part of the Composer Portraits series, the composer and multi-instrumentalist’s music was both sparse and voluptuous.

  90. He Helped Create A.I. Now, He Worries About ‘Killer Robots.’ World, March 29

    Still, Yoshua Bengio, an artificial intelligence pioneer and co-winner of this year’s prestigious A.M. Turing prize, says A.I. will prove to be a boon, if regulated.

  91. Modern Monetary Theory Makes Sense, Up to a Point Business, March 29

    Urgent goals might justify more debt for a while, the economist Robert Shiller says, but this does not license unlimited spending or endlessly accelerating debt.

  92. The Lost History of One of the World’s Strangest Science Experiments Sunday Review, March 29

    The hummingbirds were dying. Cockroaches were everywhere. And then Steve Bannon showed up.

  93. L. Douglas Wilder, Ex-Governor of Virginia, Accused of Sexual Harassment by College Student U.S., March 28

    A 22-year-old woman accused Mr. Wilder, the country’s first elected African-American governor, of kissing her without her consent in 2017.

  94. The Plague Killing Frogs Everywhere Is Far Worse Than Scientists Thought Science, March 28

    As a threat to wildlife, an amphibian fungus has become “the most deadly pathogen known to science.”

  95. At 71, She’s Never Felt Pain or Anxiety. Now Scientists Know Why. Health, March 28

    Scientists discovered a previously unidentified genetic mutation in a Scottish woman. They hope it could lead to the development of new pain treatment.

  96. Shambles Opinion, March 28

    A Brexit scoreboard: Solutions 0, Chaos 8.

  97. The Implicit Punishment of Daring to Go to College When Poor Opinion, March 28

    A documentary to be screened on Capitol Hill next month, in which I am featured, chronicles the experience of low-income students navigating college admissions.

  98. Who Botched the Mueller Report? Opinion, March 28

    And should we abolish the Electoral College?

  99. Drawing the Line Between Helping and Helicoptering Well, March 28

    In the wake of the college bribery scandal, critiques of parents who meddle too much can leave us questioning our everyday instincts to help our children.

  100. ‘Scotty’ the T. Rex Is the Heaviest Ever Found, Scientists Say Science, March 28

    The dinosaur, named Scotty, was excavated the Saskatchewan province of Canada in the 1990s. A recent study shows that it is the heaviest and oldest specimen of its kind.

  101. Janet Lieberman, 97, a Force in Community College Education, Dies Obituaries, March 27

    From its inception she was a guiding spirit at LaGuardia Community College in Queens with national influence in helping underserved students.

  102. Frustrated Democrats Intensify Demand for Big Institutional Changes U.S., March 27

    Liberal activists are calling for ending the Senate filibuster and expanding the Supreme Court, but others in the Democratic Party are urging caution.

  103. He Changed ‘Oklahoma!’ But ‘Oklahoma!’ Hasn’t Changed Him. Theater, March 27

    How the director Daniel Fish stuck to his guns and rode his darkly visionary take on Rodgers & Hammerstein’s classic from the experimental fringes to Broadway.

  104. Three Pioneers in Artificial Intelligence Win Turing Award Technology, March 27

    For their work on neural networks, Geoffrey Hinton, Yann LeCun and Yoshua Bengio will share $1 million for what many consider the Nobel Prize of computing.

  105. Turing Award Won by 3 Pioneers in Artificial Intelligence Technology, March 27

    For their work on neural networks, Geoffrey Hinton, Yann LeCun and Yoshua Bengio will share $1 million for what many consider the Nobel Prize of computing.

  106. People Don’t Bribe College Officials to Help Their Kids. They Do It to Help Themselves. Magazine, March 27

    At least one of the students whose parents stand accused of fraud doesn’t appear to have been very interested in higher education in the first place.

  107. Do You Speak My Language? You Should Opinion, March 26

    In an increasingly global world, Americans should be adding, not slashing, opportunities for their children to learn another tongue.

  108. A Chinese Law Professor Criticized Xi. Now He’s Been Suspended. World, March 26

    Xu Zhangrun boldly criticized China’s repressive policies. Now his university has suspended him and started an inquiry. But he is not retreating.

  109. For an Asian-American Family, the Cost of Education Well, March 26

    The college admission scandal and a lawsuit charging admissions discrimination at Harvard have special resonance for families like mine, where parents sacrifice so much for their children’s opportunities.

  110. Cal Ramsey, Knicks Broadcaster and Community Representative, Dies at 81 Obituaries, March 25

    A standout player at N.Y.U., he had a brief N.B.A. career but made his mark as a color commentator and the team’s link to the youth of New York.

  111. Duke University to Pay $112.5 Million to Settle Claims of Research Misconduct Science, March 25

    The university submitted falsified data in connection with 30 grants obtained from the N.I.H. and E.P.A., according to a whistle-blower lawsuit.

  112. Duke University to Pay $112.5 Million to Settle Claims of Research Misconduct Science, March 25

    The university submitted falsified data in connection with 30 grants obtained from the N.I.H. and E.P.A., according to a whistle-blower lawsuit.

  113. 12 People, Including 6 Coaches, Plead Not Guilty in College Admissions Scandal U.S., March 25

    Those who appeared in a Boston court on Monday included the top tennis coach at Georgetown and an assistant teacher at a Houston public school.

  114. Museums Cut Ties With Sacklers as Outrage Over Opioid Crisis Grows Arts, March 25

    Accusations that the family behind OxyContin actively played down its perils have led arts and education institutions to rethink accepting Sackler funds.

  115. A Jewish Cemetery in Missouri Was Vandalized and Repaired. Now a Man Has Been Sentenced. U.S., March 25

    The man pleaded guilty to institutional vandalism for toppling more than 100 headstones at a St. Louis-area cemetery in 2017. He was sentenced to three years of probation.

  116. A Colonial-Era Cemetery Resurfaces in Philadelphia Science, March 25

    Remains buried in the First Baptist cemetery were believed to have been moved in 1860. But many coffins and bones were still there.

  117. How to Address Social Immobility? ‘The Human Network’ Offers a Road Map Business, March 25

    The United States ranks toward the bottom of social mobility. Professor Matthew O. Jackson’s new book shows why proposals to reduce inequality won’t solve the problem of mobility.

  118. Why Colleges Like Trump’s Campus Speech Order Opinion, March 25

    Deans don’t want call-out culture either — they just can’t say so out loud.

  119. Let’s Hear It for State U. Opinion, March 25

    Sometimes the best school isn’t the “elite” college at the top of the national rankings. It’s the public university just down the road.

  120. Will the Supreme Court End Gerrymandering? Arguments Begin This Week U.S., March 25

    Justices will be reviewing the case of North Carolina, where Republicans drew a map to maximize their power in the House. Plaintiffs challenging the map say it’s unconstitutional.

  121. Eager to Court Jews (and Fracture Democrats), Republicans Push Bills on Anti-Semitism U.S., March 24

    The bills are part of a larger political strategy aimed partly at showing that Republicans are more willing to tackle anti-Semitic hate speech than divided Democrats.

  122. ‘Pick My Cotton’: Video of Mock Whipping Prompts Fraternity to Expel 4 Students U.S., March 24

    The University of Georgia chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon was temporarily suspended and four students were expelled after the video was circulated online.

  123. How College Changed My Life Opinion, March 23

    We asked readers to discuss how the people they met and classes they took influenced them, and how much going to an elite school matters.

  124. Felicity Huffman: Desperate Housewife, Devoted Parent and Now a Defendant Arts, March 23

    When the actress was implicated in the college admissions scandal, it stunned people in her acting circles and at the prestigious high school her older daughter attends.

  125. Anita Silvers, an Authority on Disability Rights, Dies at 78 Obituaries, March 22

    A well-regarded philosophy professor, Dr. Silvers knew the subject firsthand, having had polio as a child.

  126. Your Ancestors Were Slaves. Who Owns the Photos of Them? Arts, March 22

    A lawsuit against Harvard over two haunting 1850 photographs stirs debate over how to balance the need to preserve history and the moral claims of descendants.

  127. A College Investor Who Beats the Ivys Business, March 22

    Paula Volent started in art conservation. But at Bowdoin, she has become one of the nation’s most successful financial managers of a college endowment.

  128. When Gun Buybacks Work, and When They Fall Short U.S., March 21

    Governments that want to curb gun violence frequently offer bounties for turning in weapons. New Zealand and Washington State are among the latest.

  129. A Lighter Matthew Barney Goes Back to School, and Back Home Arts, March 21

    The artist dances with wolves, and hunters, in his new film “Redoubt,” shot in his native Idaho. It’s the most emancipated work of his career.

  130. Trump to Sign Order Protecting ‘Free Inquiry’ on College Campuses U.S., March 21

    The order would link some higher education funds to how colleges enforce free speech rights, a cause célèbre for conservatives who argue their voices have been silenced.

  131. Trump Signs Executive Order Protecting Free Speech on College Campuses U.S., March 21

    The order links some higher education funds to how colleges enforce free speech rights, a cause célèbre for conservatives who argue their voices have been silenced.

  132. Why in the World? Opinion, March 21

    College sports do have some upsides. But their sheer scale is silly.

  133. Is Trump Causing White Terrorism? Opinion, March 21

    And what would a fair college admissions system look like?

  134. Chop Up a Worm. It Will Regenerate. Scientists Figured Out Why. Science, March 20

    Researchers identified the master control gene that enables worms to grow a new body, capturing the imagination of some humans looking for a fresh start.

  135. Who Should Own Photos of Slaves? The Descendants, not Harvard, a Lawsuit Says U.S., March 20

    A woman is suing the university for photographs taken 169 years ago of slaves she says are her ancestors. The images were taken as part of a racist study.