T/nyc

  1. Manhattan to Stop Prosecuting Prostitution, Part of Nationwide Shift Metro, Today

    The district attorney, Cyrus R. Vance Jr., moved to dismiss thousands of cases dating back decades, amid a growing movement to change the criminal justice system’s approach to prostitution.

  2. How New Yorkers Celebrated 4/20 Interactive, Today

    New Yorkers celebrated the first 4/20 since the legalization of personal use.

  3. New Yorkers React to Derek Chauvin Verdict Metro, Today

    New York residents and public figures responded with surprise, elation and resignation.

  4. New Yorkers React to Derek Chauvin Verdict Metro, Today

    New York residents and public figures responded with surprise, elation and resignation.

  5. Antibody rates among Black and Hispanic New Yorkers are double those of others, new estimates show. Metro, Today

    A study found at least a third of Black and Hispanic New York City residents had antibodies after the first wave a year ago, but only 16 percent of white New Yorkers did.

  6. Andrew Yang Wins Endorsement from Left-Wing Rival Metro, Today

    Carlos Menchaca, who bowed out of the New York City mayoral race last month, will endorse his former opponent.

  7. He Said to ‘Kill Your Senators’ in an Online Video. Now He’s on Trial. Metro, Today

    The trial of Brendan Hunt, an avid Trump backer and New York City resident, will be one of the justice system’s first attempts to grapple with the events of Jan. 6.

  8. In Harlem, Chauvin Verdict Represents ‘a Little Bit of Justice’ Video, Yesterday

    The final verdict in the murder trial of Derek Chauvin was broadcast live across the country. Our camera captured reaction from New York.

  9. Tiny Love Stories: ‘My First Spring Without Her’ Styles, Yesterday

    Modern Love in miniature, featuring reader-submitted stories of no more than 100 words.

  10. Iris, From John Fraser, Opens in Midtown Manhattan Dining, Yesterday

    An Eataly restaurant teams up with Color Factory, mostly vegan selections from Baja California, and more restaurant news.

  11. Recent Commercial Real Estate Transactions Business, Yesterday

    Recent commercial real estate transactions in New York.

  12. 17 Restaurants Where New Yorkers Can Make Up for Lost Time Dining, Yesterday

    Spring blossoms and vaccinations are bringing the city out of hibernation. Pete Wells shares his favorite places that opened while many of us were staying home.

  13. They Came to N.Y.C. for Acceptance. Now They Need Jobs. Metro, Yesterday

    A new city program for homeless L.G.B.T.Q. youth will offer job placement, education and mental health support to help them achieve career success.

  14. Cuomo’s Pandemic Book Leads to an Investigation Metro, Yesterday

    Gov. Cuomo is already weathering investigations into his professional conduct and personal behavior — and now his work as an author will be scrutinized as well.

  15. How the Pandemic Did, and Didn't, Change Where Americans Move Interactive, April 19

    As disruptive as the pandemic has been, for the most part it hasn’t altered the underlying forces shaping where people want to live.

  16. Teachers’ Union Backs Stringer for N.Y.C. Mayor, Giving Him a Boost Metro, April 19

    The endorsement comes at a critical time for the city comptroller, who has struggled to gain traction in the race.

  17. A Tireless Actress, Back at the Scene of the ‘Crime’ Culture, April 19

    Before the pandemic, Catherine Russell had missed only four performances of an Off Broadway perennial since 1987. She was onstage for its reopening.

  18. There Could Never Be a Female Andrew Yang Op Ed, April 19

    No woman with his résumé would have a chance of becoming New York’s mayor.

  19. New Yorkers can soon get vaccinated under the natural history museum’s big blue whale. Metro, April 19

    Starting Friday, all New York City residents will be eligible to receive a coronavirus vaccine at the American Museum of Natural History.

  20. Looted Objects From Afghanistan Are Returned Culture, April 19

    Thirty-three antiquities were handed over to the Afghan ambassador by the Manhattan district attorney’s office and the Department of Homeland Security.

  21. Looted Objects From Afghanistan Are Returned Culture, April 19

    Thirty-three antiquities were handed over to the Afghan ambassador by the Manhattan district attorney’s office and the Department of Homeland Security.

  22. The Climate Clock Now Ticks With a Tinge of Optimism Culture, April 19

    The display in New York’s Union Square, which reports the window to address global warming, now also measures the rising use of renewable energy.

  23. Michael Musto, Lynn Yaeger and Mickey Boardman: Friends for Life T Style, April 19

    The longtime crew has been all around New York together and witnessed the city remake itself time and again. What’s endured is its members’ bonds with one another.

  24. N.Y.P.D. to Limit Use of ‘Sound Cannon’ on Crowds After Protesters’ Lawsuit Metro, April 19

    The Police Department has agreed to stop using an “alert” noise on the devices after demonstrators and photographers sued, saying it caused migraines and dizziness.

  25. Ray McGuire Wants to Show He’s Not Just the Wall Street Candidate Metro, April 19

    Mr. McGuire has landed endorsements from Representative Gregory W. Meeks and three hip-hop giants as his campaign for New York mayor enters a crucial phase.

  26. New York Spent $1.5 Billion on Its Convention Center. Will Anyone Come? Metro, April 19

    The expansion of the Javits Center is almost complete, but the pandemic has kept it from hosting events for more than a year.

  27. How the Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Pause Affects New York Metro, April 19

    A program to vaccinate homebound older people was put on hold while the one-shot vaccine was paused.

  28. Brooklyn Man Finds New Life in Crime (Writing) Books, April 19

    Jonathan Ames, known for his confessional essays and TV shows like “Bored to Death,” tries his hand at a detective novel with “A Man Named Doll.”

  29. Tell Me the One About the Presidential Candidate Who Ran for Mayor Op Ed, April 19

    Or the mayor who ran for president.

  30. They Told Her Women Couldn’t Join the Ambulance Corps. So She Started Her Own. Gender, April 19

    Judge Rachel Freier has helped dozens of Orthodox Jewish women in New York City get training and start work as emergency medical technicians. In doing so, she challenged her community’s conception of the role women can play in public and professio...

  31. Yang Lands Last Place on Ballot: 5 Takeaways From the Mayor’s Race Metro, April 19

    The ballot order for the June 22 New York mayoral primary was decided by lottery, not alphabetical order, but Andrew Yang will still appear last.

  32. New York City expands walk-in vaccinations to people 50 and older. World, April 18

    The eligibility expansion comes as vaccination appointments open up. The city remains at high risk for infections, but relatively stable.

  33. California Beach Seized in 1924 From a Black Family Could Be Returned Express, April 18

    Nearly a century ago, the city of Manhattan Beach shuttered a resort that belonged to Willa and Charles Bruce. Though the county is trying to give the land back, the city has declined to apologize.

  34. Homes That Sold for Around $1.5 Million Real Estate, April 18

    Recent residential sales in New York City and the region.

  35. ‘By the Time We Reached Main Street, I Had Lost Sight of Him ’ Metropolitan, April 18

    Commuting from Queens to Manhattan, neglected at the library and more reader tales of New York City in this week’s Metropolitan Diary.

  36. Vartan Gregorian, Savior of the New York Public Library, Dies at 87 Obits, April 16

    A scholar, a university leader and a believer in libraries, he almost single-handedly rescued a grand but broken one in a time of municipal austerity.

  37. Dark Money in the New York Mayor’s Race Politics, April 16

    This year’s election is shaping up to be the city’s first in which super PACs play a major role.

  38. Andrew Yang Responds: ‘My Targeted Plan for the City Will Be a Lifeline for Many’ Letters, April 16

    The candidate for mayor of New York responds to a column by Paul Krugman.

  39. Head of New York Theater Workshop to Depart in 2022 Culture, April 16

    James C. Nicola, who balanced provocative programming with shows aimed at Broadway, will have served 34 years as artistic director.

  40. ‘In the Heights’ Will Premiere at the Tribeca Festival Culture, April 16

    The movie musical is set to play the United Palace in Washington Heights, the neighborhood where the story is set. It will also screen outdoors in all five boroughs.

  41. How a Legendary New York Hotel Became a Battleground Metropolitan, April 16

    Mark Twain and Bob Dylan slept at the Chelsea. Now, developers hope to lure tourists, but they have to soothe some frustrated tenants.

  42. What Will Happen to All the Empty Office Buildings and Hotels? Real Estate, April 16

    Commercial real estate has been hit hard by the pandemic, but there are plans to convert some of the now empty spaces into apartment buildings.

  43. ‘Sentí que tenía un propósito’: la pandemia puede mostrar otras oportunidades para el futuro en Español, April 16

    Cuando la vida se interrumpe por una crisis, algunas personas ven oportunidades (de cambio, acción, introspección) que, de otra manera, no tomarían en cuenta.

  44. How George Hahn, Urban Raconteur, Spends His Sundays Metropolitan, April 16

    He is devoted to his dogs, his tiny apartment and most of all these days, his city.

  45. Art of the Dealer: Paula Cooper Shores Up Her Legacy Arts & Leisure, April 16

    She opened the first gallery in SoHo and was a part of Chelsea’s initial wave. Now, at 83, the dean of ‘tough art’ will bring in new partners and start a year-round branch in Palm Beach.

  46. Why Reopening Ceremonies in NYC Are So Important Right Now Metropolitan, April 16

    Movie theaters, hotels, restaurants and other businesses are putting a lot of thought into the process.

  47. As N.Y. Courts Seek to Root Out Racism, a Clerk Is Heard Using a Slur Metro, April 16

    A lawyer for a teenager said he overheard racist comments directed at his client during a hearing in New York Family Court. The incident came months after a judge warned about racism in the courts.

  48. She Works in a Homeless Shelter, and She Lives in One, Too Metro, April 16

    Many employees of New York’s homeless shelters are themselves in precarious economic situations, taking on multiple jobs, working overtime and struggling to find their own homes.

  49. When Our Presses Rocked: A Music Video Starring a Beatle and The Times Insider, April 16

    Paul McCartney and the newspaper both make special appearances in Dominic Fike’s cover of “The Kiss of Venus.”

  50. How a Sewage Flood Upended Lives in Queens Metro, April 16

    More than 16 months after a sewage flood wrecked their homes, some South Ozone Park residents say they’re still waiting for help from the city.

  51. Dia Chelsea, Keeper of the Avant-Garde Flame Culture, April 15

    A home of Minimalism has reopened after a transformative renovation and expansion, its purifying vision intact.

  52. Andrew Yang Hasn’t Done the Math Op Ed, April 15

    Was his economic story too good to check?

  53. Outside Money Floods Mayor’s Race, Raising Ethics Concerns Metro, April 15

    For the first time since the Supreme Court allowed unlimited spending in elections, candidate super PACs are flooding money into a New York mayoral election.

  54. Why Bill de Blasio Is Finally Having Fun as Mayor Metro, April 15

    Mr. de Blasio is stepping out of the shadow of Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who is facing various scandals, and emerging as a cheerleader for New York City’s recovery.

  55. Dia Chelsea, Keeper of the Avant-Garde Flame Arts, April 15

    A home of Minimalism has reopened after a transformative renovation and expansion, its purifying vision intact.

  56. 400 Days Later, the New York Philharmonic Returns Weekend, April 15

    The orchestra’s first indoor concert for a live audience in 13 months was a quietly joyful celebration.

  57. On the Met’s Roof, a Wistful Fantasy We’ve Been Waiting For Culture, April 15

    “As Long as the Sun Lasts” is a winsome crowd-pleaser that turns gentle circles without ever getting anywhere.

  58. A Glut of Available Manhattan Office Space Real Estate, April 15

    Office space available for lease is at its highest level in at least three decades, according to a recent report.

  59. How Are There Only Three Lesbian Bars in New York City? Metropolitan, April 15

    As the effects of the pandemic unfurl, lesbians are worried about losing their few brick-and-mortar spaces.

  60. Homes for Sale in Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens Real Estate, April 15

    This week’s homes are in the financial district, Boerum Hill and Forest Hills.

  61. On the Market in New York City Slideshow, April 15

    This week’s homes are in the Financial district, Boerum Hill and Forest Hills.

  62. A New York Intellectual Bastion Finds a New Home Culture, April 15

    The New York Institute for the Humanities, founded in 1977 as a venue for cross-disciplinary conversation, is moving to the New York Public Library.

  63. The ‘Herald Square Bomber’ Who Wasn’t Magazine, April 15

    Since 9/11, U.S. authorities have used informants to convict hundreds of people of crimes related to international terrorism. Did the informants help create plots where none had existed?

  64. Some New Yorkers Don’t Want the Superrich to Return Styles, April 15

    Sure, the tax revenue is nice. But ….

  65. Some New Yorkers Don’t Want the Superrich to Return Styles, April 15

    Sure, the tax revenue is nice. But ….

  66. 5 Things to Do This Weekend Culture, April 15

    Our critics and writers have selected noteworthy cultural events to experience virtually and in person in New York City.

  67. Raw Sewage Flooded Their Homes. They’re Still Waiting for Help. Metro, April 15

    New York City accepted responsibility for a collapsed pipe that flooded 127 homes in Queens in 2019, but it has been slow to pay homeowners.

  68. She Had to Escape Her 175-Square-Foot Studio During the Pandemic. Which Option Would You Choose? Interactive, April 15

    Figuring she could get a better deal as rents fell, a young Manhattanite cast a wide net for ‘something with a door,’ not too far from work. Here’s what she found.

  69. A Cemetery’s Big Secret: Lots of Weird Mushrooms Styles, April 15

    Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn is a treasure trove for amateur fungi hunters. Just don’t pick any.

  70. The Mayoral Race Heats Up for Top Contenders Metro, April 15

    The Working Families Party endorsed three candidates, and Andrew Yang encountered some animosity.

  71. This Ain’t No Disco: Alone in a Crowd at the Armory Culture, April 14

    At times, the experience of “SOCIAL! the social distance dance club” felt no more freeing than dancing by myself in my cramped living room, our critic says.

  72. He Has Trained to Be Mayor for Decades. Will Voters Be Persuaded? Metro, April 14

    Scott Stringer’s deep experience in New York City politics has yet to translate into momentum in the mayor’s race. Could an endorsement from the Working Families Party help?

  73. N.Y.P.D.’s Robot Dog Returns to Work, Touching Off a Backlash Metro, April 14

    Deployed at a public housing building, the device drew condemnation as a stark example of police power and misplaced priorities.

  74. Miami Outdoor Theater Hit Announces a New York Arrival Culture, April 14

    “The Seven Deadly Sins,” a theatrical anthology series, will start off on June 23 at a series of storefront windows in the Meatpacking District.

  75. With a Drone on the High Line, an Artist Re-emerges From Controversy Culture, April 14

    Sam Durant reveals his first large-scale sculpture in the public sphere since the “Scaffold” controversy in Minneapolis.

  76. 4 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now Culture, April 14

    Arthur Jafa remixes Robert Mapplethorpe; Sanou Oumar leaps forward; Ray Johnson makes connections; TR Ericsson processes grief.

  77. New Target for New York’s Ascendant Left: Rep. Carolyn Maloney Metro, April 14

    Justice Democrats, a left-wing group that fueled the rise of Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is backing Rana Abdelhamid’s primary bid.

  78. New Target for New York’s Ascendant Left: Rep. Carolyn Maloney Metro, April 14

    Justice Democrats, a left-wing group that fueled the rise of Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, is backing Rana Abdelhamid’s primary bid.

  79. Covid-19 in New York: Variants and Johnson & Johnson Metro, April 14

    More contagious variants of the Covid-19 virus account for three-quarters of new cases in the city.

  80. Covid-19 in New York: Variants and Johnson & Johnson Metro, April 14

    More-contagious variants of the Covid-19 virus account for three-quarters of new cases in the city.

  81. Reanimating ‘Cabaret,’ One Frame at a Time Interactive, April 14

    A first look at extraordinary images from the groundbreaking 1966 musical turns Broadway history into something that’s (literally) moving.

  82. Coney Island Is Just What the Doctor Ordered Editorial, April 13

    New York’s charming old amusement park delivers the springtime joy we all need.

  83. How the Coronavirus Variants Are Spreading in New York City Metro, April 13

    New, searchable ZIP code-level data provides a close look at how contagious variants have kept New York’s case levels alarmingly high.

  84. Recent Commercial Real Estate Transactions Business, April 13

    Recent commercial real estate transactions in New York.

  85. How the Coronavirus Variants Are Spreading in New York City Metro, April 13

    New, searchable ZIP code-level data provides a close look at how contagious variants have kept New York’s case levels alarmingly high.

  86. Wylie Dufresne Starts Stretch Pizza, Selling Pies Out of Breads Bakery Dining, April 13

    Charlie Palmer turns Aureole into a flagship for his steakhouses; Gage & Tollner unveils its dining room; and more restaurant news.

  87. Lincoln Center’s Plaza Is Going Green. Really. Culture, April 13

    Lincoln Center, whose theaters remain closed by the pandemic, will cover the plaza around its fountain with a synthetic lawn as it pivots to outdoor performances.

  88. A Disastrous Year for Brooklyn’s Chinatown: ‘It’s Just So Hard’ Metro, April 13

    Signs of life have returned to Sunset Park, but businesses are struggling and racism and hate crimes have made things worse. “The neighborhood hasn’t recovered,” a restaurant manager said.

  89. Why Closing a Nuclear Plant Could Hurt N.Y.’s Environment Metro, April 13

    The nuclear power plant at Indian Point will close at the end of the month, but the shutdown could cause a spike in greenhouse gases.

  90. A ‘Blue Bloods’ Regular on the Importance of ‘Yes’ Real Estate, April 13

    For the actor Vanessa Ray, what makes a one-bedroom near Lincoln Center home are a few essentials: Bill Nye, blankets and one three-letter word.

  91. Midtown Has Been Empty, but Other Retail Zones Have Bounced Back Real Estate, April 13

    Shopping locally has helped foot traffic in some commercial districts across the city return almost to prepandemic levels.

  92. The City That Won’t Shut Up Fills Two New Books With Its Babble Book Review, April 13

    “New Yorkers,” an oral history by Craig Taylor, and “Names of New York,” Joshua Jelly-Schapiro’s chronicle of street names, capture the dizzying variety and fluidity of the city’s stories.

  93. Biden nominates former New Jersey attorney general to lead D.E.A. Washington, April 12

    Anne Milgram built her reputation fighting crime in the city of Camden.

  94. Two worrisome variants make up over 70 percent of cases analyzed in N.Y.C., city officials say. Metro, April 12

    The data represents the first time city officials have offered a ZIP-code level look at how the variants have been spreading in New York City.

  95. Head of Elite Catholic School Is Fired Over Sexual Misconduct Charges Metro, April 12

    The Rev. Daniel Lahart, the president of Regis High School, targeted multiple adults, including subordinates, an investigation found.

  96. On the Scene: Coney Island Reopens Interactive, April 12

    Families came out to Coney Island on Friday, looking for rollercoaster rides and funnel cakes, for the first time in 18 months.

  97. Hearty Basque Food That Hemingway Would Have Understood Dining, April 12

    Ernesto’s, on the Lower East Side, channels San Sebastián with an unfussy menu and a generous hand.

  98. Basque Tavern Fare at Ernesto’s Slideshow, April 12

    The chef Ryan Bartlow brings a rugged style of cooking to his restaurant on the Lower East Side.

  99. Over 50,000 N.Y.C. public school students will return to classrooms, including in middle and high school. Metro, April 12

    The change follows recent federal guidance that schools could reduce social distancing between students in some classrooms to three feet from six.

  100. Party Friends T Style, April 12

    For three years, the comedian Bowen Yang found community at Bubble_T, New York’s roving hub for queer Asian nightlife. Then the pandemic hit.

  101. Friends Who Saw It All T Style, April 12

    In good times and bad, a group of tried-and-true New Yorkers have found comfort in one another.

  102. Indian Point Is Shutting Down. That Means More Fossil Fuel. Metro, April 12

    When the Indian Point nuclear power plant shuts, its lost output will be filled primarily by generators that burn fuels that contribute to climate change.

  103. Friends Who Protect One Another T Style, April 12

    For Linux, Xunami Muse, Bobby LeMaire and the rest of their close-knit group, finding your chosen family means never having to be alone.

  104. Work Friends T Style, April 12

  105. The State of the Mayoral Race in N.Y.C. Metro, April 12

    The Democratic primary that will likely determine the next mayor is fast approaching, and the race is heating up among top contenders.

  106. An Affordable Duplex That’s Good for Dogs and Drums Real Estate, April 12

    It’s not easy to find an affordable rental when you’re a drummer. One Manhattanite tried some unorthodox tactics and found a gem.

  107. The Not-Quite-Everything Store Styles, April 12

    Wish, the ultra-budget e-commerce app, is about as online as shopping gets. What happens when it comes to your neighborhood?

  108. How Biden Can Free America From Its Zoning Straitjacket Op Ed, April 12

    If a state wants funds for infrastructure, it should meet strict conditions about housing construction.

  109. Who Will ‘Vax Daddy’ Endorse? 5 Takeaways From N.Y.C. Mayor’s Race. Metro, April 12

    Candidates vied for the backing of the influential teachers’ union and other players, and one contender made a journey to Minneapolis.

  110. 10 Weeks to the Finish Line: New York’s Mayoral Race Heats Up Metro, April 11

    With the primary weeks away, candidates are sharpening their attacks, ramping up in-person events and preparing to spend the millions of dollars that they have stockpiled.

  111. Homes That Sold for Around $440,000 Real Estate, April 11

    Recent residential sales in New York City and the region.

  112. ‘My Friends and I Knew Every Neighbor, and They Knew Us’ Metropolitan, April 11

    On the old block, another Thursday at the bodega and more reader tales of New York City in this week’s Metropolitan Diary.

  113. A Love Letter to Black Women National, April 10

    A first solo exhibition by the Bahamian artist Gio Swaby aims to redefine the often politicized Black body.

  114. Turn the Lights Out. Here Come the Birds. Express, April 10

    Buildings, landmarks and monuments are turning off lights to prevent fatal impacts as birds set off on spring migration.

  115. ‘Sense of Disappointment’ on the Left as the N.Y.C. Mayor’s Race Unfolds Metro, April 10

    Even as New York has veered toward the left, two more-moderate candidates, Andrew Yang and Eric Adams, lead the mayoral race.

  116. Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Cosmic Nature’ Dots a Bronx Garden Culture, April 9

    The artist’s lifelong fascination with the natural world inspires monumental floral sculptures in the New York Botanical Garden.

  117. Wait, Could Andrew Yang Really Be New York’s Next Mayor? Op Ed, April 9

    The eccentric-entrepreneur-turned-failed-presidential-candidate is campaigning on a promise to make the city fun again. It might work.

  118. Turkey Fights for Return of a Work It Says Was Looted Culture, April 9

    A bench trial in Federal District Court in Manhattan concerns an ancient idol held by Christie’s.

  119. The Union Defeat at an Amazon Warehouse Letters, April 9

    Readers take two sides of the argument. Also: Affordable housing in SoHo; Native American food insecurity; the healing power of art.

  120. What Happens to Theaters When They're Closed? Interactive, April 9

    A peek inside the performance spaces shuttered during the pandemic.

  121. 3 Artists Are Urged to Go Big. They Didn’t Hold Back. Arts & Leisure, April 9

    In the show “Brand New Heavies,” three female artists answer the curators’ invitation “to do stuff they haven’t been able to do” elsewhere. Like a 20-foot-tall version of the U.S. Capitol dome.

  122. Why This Toxic Canal Zone Is a Litmus Test for N.Y.C. Development Metropolitan, April 9

    The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn is notorious for its century-old filth. Now that the cleanup of the waterway has begun, a thorny question emerges. Who gets to live there?

  123. A Rough Ride for N.Y.C. Cabbies Sunday Business, April 9

    “This business will never be good again,” said one New York City taxi driver struggling to pay off his medallion debt, which was made worse by the pandemic.

  124. The Indestructible Townhouse Real Estate, April 9

    Over 211 years, the Dickey House in Lower Manhattan has survived everything New York City has thrown at it. Soon it will become part of a new home for Public School 150.

  125. Becoming a Schoolhouse Slideshow, April 9

    A townhouse that is more than 200 years old will soon get a new purpose.

  126. How a Brooklyn Arts and Food Activist Spends Her Sundays Metropolitan, April 9

    Tiffiney Davis has known hunger, so she’s doing something about it.

  127. New York Is Taxing the Rich. Here’s Who Made That Happen. Metropolitan, April 9

    A budget that spends on education, homelessness and undocumented immigrants is the product of years of progressive politics, not a governor looking for a diversion.

  128. New York Is Taxing the Rich. Here’s Who Made That Happen. Metropolitan, April 9

    A budget that spends on education, homelessness and undocumented immigrants is the product of years of progressive politics, not a governor looking for a diversion.

  129. The Outlook for Public Schools in N.Y.C. Metro, April 9

    The temporary closures of schools that have frustrated parents may soon become less common under new virus rules.

  130. Niki de Saint Phalle: Nothing More Shocking Than Joy Weekend, April 8

    At MoMA PS1 and Salon 94, the French-American artist gets long overdue attention for her boundary-defying architecture and public sculptures.

  131. Former In-Law of Trump Executive Gives Prosecutors Boxes of Documents Metro, April 8

    The handover of the documents suggests prosecutors are stepping up pressure on the executive, Allen H. Weisselberg.

  132. ‘The Start of a Comeback’ in 5 U.S. Cities Travel, April 8

    With vaccinations picking up, warmer weather and increased business reopenings over the last week, tourism has picked up in these destinations.

  133. ‘The Start of a Comeback’ in 5 U.S. Cities Travel, April 8

    With vaccinations picking up, warmer weather and increased business reopenings over the last week, tourism has picked up in these destinations.

  134. José Andrés Will Open Two Restaurants in NoMad Dining, April 8

    Outposts of Zaytinya, one of his Washington, D.C., restaurants, and the Bazaar by José Andrés, are coming to a new Ritz-Carlton hotel in Manhattan.

  135. After Pandemic, Shrinking Need for Office Space Could Crush Landlords Business, April 8

    Some big employers are giving up square footage as they juggle remote work. That could devastate building owners and cities.

  136. N.Y.C.’s mayor says a new virus rule will reduce temporary public school closures. Metro, April 8

    Public schools had previously closed for 10 days if two unlinked cases were detected there, regardless of the source of infection.

  137. To Combat Anti-Asian Attacks, New Yorkers Join Neighborhood Watch Patrols Metropolitan, April 8

    Alarmed and outraged by a surge in racist violence, citizens band together to make city streets safer.

  138. Homes for Sale in Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan Real Estate, April 8

    This week’s properties are in Astoria, South Harlem and Bay Ridge.

  139. On the Market in New York City Slideshow, April 8

    This week’s properties are in Astoria, South Harlem and Bay Ridge.

  140. Why Students Are Logging In to Class From 7,000 Miles Away Metro, April 8

    Students are joining remote classes from outside the country. In one New Jersey school district, computers were traced to 24 countries on a day last month.

  141. Facing the Pandemic Together, but in Manhattan or Brooklyn? Interactive, April 8

    A young couple joined forces to get through 2020 and beyond, but would they find what they wanted in her East Side neighborhood or his beloved Williamsburg? Here’s where they landed.

  142. N.Y.C.’s Pools and Beaches Will Reopen This Summer Metro, April 8

    The city's beach and outdoor pool season is starting on schedule after a partial and delayed reopening last summer.

  143. The Brooklyn Academy Dips a Toe Back in With Live Skating Culture, April 7

    The Brooklyn Academy of Music presented its first live performance in more than a year: Le Patin Libre, a contemporary skating company.

  144. Mario Schifano’s Excellent New York Adventure Weekend, April 7

    A new exhibition in SoHo explores the Italian artist’s connections to the midcentury American art scene.

  145. Can Colleges Require Covid-19 Vaccines? National, April 7

    It’s shaping up to be yet another political debate.

  146. Can Colleges Require Covid-19 Vaccines? National, April 7

    It’s shaping up to be yet another political debate.

  147. A Brooklyn Artist Wants Sports Fans to Wear Their Names Sports, April 7

    A Brooklyn artist uses sports iconography to commemorate Trayvon Martin, George Floyd and other Black victims of violence.

  148. Out of the Pandemic, Chances for Another Future Special Sections, April 7

    When life is disrupted by crisis, some people see opportunities — for change, action, introspection — they might not otherwise.

  149. My Son’s Yeshiva Is Breaking the Law Op Ed, April 7

    Ultra-Orthodox schools must provide a proper education, but politicians aren’t holding them accountable.

  150. What N.Y. State’s Budget Means Metro, April 7

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the Legislature have agreed on a budget that will raise taxes on the wealthy and help those devastated by the pandemic.