T/nyc

  1. Trump-Nadler Feud, Renewed by Mueller Report New York, Today

    Friday: The prominent New Yorkers have been battling for decades.

  2. Historic Bank Buildings Get a Second Act Real Estate, Today

    New developments across the city are repurposing the opulent spaces where New Yorkers once deposited their savings.

  3. A New Role for Grand Old Banks Slideshow, Today

    New developments across the city are adapting the opulent spaces where New Yorkers once deposited their savings.

  4. It’s Eastertime, and the Duck Rescuers Are Ready New York, Today

    Mandarin duck mania has inspired talk of a new feeding ban, in all parks, of all animals. This has stressed out those who rescue abandoned ducks, the number of which increases after Easter.

  5. How Bette Smith, Soul Singer, Spends Her Sundays New York, Today

    Born and bred in Bedford-Stuyvesant and now living in Park Slope, the performer likes to slow down the pace on the weekends with yoga, meditation and time with her dog, Jeremiah.

  6. The Real Stars of the Internet Style, Today

    The rater has become the rated.

  7. Mueller Report Leaves Unanswered Questions About Contacts Between Russians and Trump Aides U.S., Yesterday

    Starting during the campaign and through the transition, a parade of Russians dangled business deals, floated policy options and sought high-level meetings.

  8. Netflix, Which Made ‘Kimmy Schmidt’ in Brooklyn, to Expand Production Studios There New York, Yesterday

    The streaming company said it would spend up to $100 million on six soundstages in Brooklyn, adding to New York City’s growing role in the film industry.

  9. Police Officer Wounded in Wild Shootout in Upper Manhattan New York, Yesterday

    Two officers cornered a man with a gun in a parking lot, who fired at them. The man was fatally shot and one officer was wounded.

  10. Did New York City’s Population Fall? Yes. And No. New York, Yesterday

    City planning officials dispute the latest census figures, which suggest that New York’s post-recession growth has finally slowed.

  11. 5 Dance Performances to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, Yesterday

    Our guide to dance performances happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  12. 15 Plays and Musicals to Go to in N.Y.C. This Weekend Theater, Yesterday

    Previews, openings and some last-chance picks.

  13. 5 Comedy Shows to Catch in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, Yesterday

    Our guide to stand-up, improv and variety shows happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  14. 12 Pop, Rock and Jazz Concerts to Check Out in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, Yesterday

    Our guide to pop and rock shows and the best of live jazz happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  15. 18 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, Yesterday

    Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.

  16. 6 Film Series to Catch in N.Y.C. This Weekend Movies, Yesterday

    Our guide to film series and special screenings.

  17. 7 Classical Music Concerts to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, Yesterday

    Our guide to the city’s best classical music and opera happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  18. 8 Things to Do With Your Kids in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, Yesterday

    Our guide to cultural events in New York City for children and teenagers happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  19. El Al Airline Warns of Measles After Flight Attendant Falls Into Coma Travel, Yesterday

    The woman was hospitalized after contracting the disease, and passengers on a flight from J.F.K. to Tel Aviv are told to watch for symptoms.

  20. The Sports Arena is a Human Zoo. Sometimes It Gets Messy. Lens, Yesterday

    After his apartment was demolished to make space for Barclays Center, Jeff Mermelstein photographed the new arena’s suits, shills and suds.

  21. The Secrets of a Sacred Underground Arts, Yesterday

    A candlelight catacombs tour of the crypt at St. Patrick’s Old Cathedral in Manhattan reveals the church’s history, including its famous tenants.

  22. ‘The Lehman Trilogy’ Criticizes Capitalism, at $2,000 a Seat New York, Yesterday

    A sold-out play casts the investment bank as the villain, but lets the plutocrat audience off easy.

  23. A Mom-and-Son Source for Portuguese Pastries Food, Yesterday

    Delicate pastéis de nata and other treats at Joey Bats Café on the Lower East Side.

  24. A Piece of Lisbon on the Lower East Side Slideshow, Yesterday

    Joey Bats Café, a Portuguese spot run by a mother-and-son team, offers pastries and savory snacks.

  25. Homes for Sale in Brooklyn and Manhattan Real Estate, Yesterday

    This week’s properties are in the financial district, Harlem and Brooklyn Heights.

  26. On the Market in New York City Slideshow, Yesterday

    This week’s properties are in the financial district, Harlem and Brooklyn Heights.

  27. Congestion Pricing: Who Pays and Who Doesn’t New York, Yesterday

    Thursday: It seems like everyone wants a break on the planned toll to enter Manhattan below 60th Street.

  28. A Room With a (New) View Interactive, Yesterday

    A Manhattan renter sets out to buy a one-bedroom with an inspiring vista and a kitchen worth cooking in. See if you can guess where he wound up.

  29. Man With Two Full Gas Cans Arrested After Entering St. Patrick’s Cathedral New York, April 17

    A church security officer turned the man away, and the police took him into custody shortly afterward.

  30. Big Buildings Hurt the Climate. New York City Hopes to Change That. New York, April 17

    To fight climate change, the city is forcing the buildings, like the Empire State Building and Trump Tower, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

  31. From the Purveyors of New York’s Best Mozzarella, a New Cafe T Magazine, April 17

    The family behind Di Palo’s, the century-old Italian specialty food store, sets its sights on the next generation.

  32. Tenants May Get More Protections in New York City, After Decades of Battles. Here’s Why. New York, April 17

    Newly empowered Democrats in Albany have hopes of approving a cadre of bills aimed at tightening rent regulations.

  33. Notre-Dame Fire Shows the Challenges of Protecting N.Y. Churches New York, April 17

    Wednesday: Old churches can present unique fire safety challenges

  34. A Ferry Subsidy of $24.75 a Ride? New York City’s Costs Are Ballooning New York, April 17

    Are ferries an expensive “niche” service or an effective form of transportation? “We’re starting a whole new form of mass transit,” Mayor Bill de Blasio recently said.

  35. How a Dark Web Drug Ring Was Uncovered After Suspicious A.T.M. Withdrawals New York, April 16

    Three New Jersey men were charged in Manhattan with setting up a virtual storefront in a hidden corner of the internet that sold illicit drugs.

  36. Noguchi Museum Will Open Sculptor’s Studio to Public After Restoration Arts, April 16

    A two-phase project is expected to begin in January 2020. When it’s complete, visitors will have access to Isamu Noguchi’s studio at an expanded campus.

  37. Congestion Pricing Is Coming to New York. New Jersey Wants Revenge. New York, April 16

    New York approved new tolls to enter the heart of Manhattan. Drivers in New Jersey say the decision amounts to a “keep out” sign.

  38. Ramen Without Broth? A Chef Doubles Down on a Sidelined Dish Food, April 16

    At Niche, a new restaurant on the Lower East Side, Shigetoshi Nakamura specializes in mazemen, a ramen style that has been slow to catch on locally.

  39. A New Kind of Noodle Shop Slideshow, April 16

    Mazemen, ramen with inventive toppings but no broth, gets a restaurant of its own on the Lower East Side.

  40. Another Reason to Hate Hudson Yards Opinion, April 16

    The billion-dollar luxury real estate project in Manhattan is exploiting a cash-for-visas program meant for the poor.

  41. Recent Commercial Real Estate Transactions Business, April 16

    Recent commercial real estate transactions in New York.

  42. We Built an ‘Unbelievable’ (but Legal) Facial Recognition Machine Interactive, April 16

    What we found shows the technology’s promise — and perils.

  43. Citi Bike’s Electric Bikes Are Fast. But Are They Dangerous? New York, April 16

    Tuesday: Citi Bike removed 1,000 pedal-assist bikes after riders reported accidents.

  44. Facing Segregated Schools, Parents Took Integration Into Their Own Hands. It’s Working. New York, April 16

    Changes to middle school enrollment in parts of Brooklyn and Manhattan could force City Hall to take action on school segregation.

  45. Trump’s History of Using 9/11 for Political Attacks New York, April 16

    Donald J. Trump has wielded the Sept. 11 attacks for many reasons, for a moment of somber reflection, for a campaign rallying cry and for personal gain.

  46. Measles, Science and the Anti-Vaxxers Opinion, April 15

    Readers discuss a lack of science literacy and Jewish beliefs about protecting the well-being of others.

  47. Measles Outbreak: Yeshiva’s Preschool Program Is Closed by New York City Health Officials New York, April 15

    The program is the first one to be closed as part of the city’s escalating effort to stem the country’s largest measles outbreak in decades.

  48. Build the Rail Freight Tunnel Under New York Harbor Opinion, April 15

    A former New York City planning official says it’s the key to improving freight and traffic flow.

  49. Rattlestick Theater Festival to Commemorate Stonewall Anniversary Theater, April 15

    The Pride Plays festival will feature more than a dozen readings from plays by seminal L.G.B.T. writers, as well as by newcomers.

  50. Stargazing and Whitman: Brooklyn Bridge Park Unveils Summer Events Arts, April 15

    The array of public activities on offer will include film screenings, concerts and outdoor classes.

  51. Inside New York City’s Majestic First Subway Station New York, April 15

    Monday: Shuttered in 1945, the station has remained largely off limits to the public and has been all but lost to generations of subway riders.

  52. A Cold Loft in an Industrial Part of Bedford-Stuyvesant? Sure Real Estate, April 15

    A musician puts up with frigid winters in a Brooklyn loft because the space allows him to build a musical community.

  53. ‘As a Proud New Yorker Who Loves Giving Directions, I Decided to Step In’ New York, April 15

    Confident about which way to go, his first day at Western Electric and more reader tales of New York City in this week’s Metropolitan Diary.

  54. Citi Bike Pulls New Electric Bikes Off Streets, Citing Safety Concerns New York, April 15

    The pedal-assist bikes operated by Lyft-owned companies in New York City, San Francisco and Washington were removed based on concerns over the brakes.

  55. City Response to Spread of Measles Is Tangled in de Blasio’s Ties to Ultra-Orthodox Jews New York, April 15

    While many ultra-Orthodox leaders have come out in favor of measles vaccinations, some say that the mayor has gone too far in legally mandating them.

  56. Endangered Spaces: Your Favorite New York Spots Are Vanishing Interactive, April 14

    We’re celebrating beloved neighborhood institutions — the local dive bar, the quirky Laundromat, the tiny shoe repair shop — that are fighting to stay open in an era of relentless change.

  57. This West Village Institution Is Fighting for Survival, One Scone at a Time New York, April 14

    Tea & Sympathy, and its two sister shops, have turned to customers to keep the doors open.

  58. For a Brooklyn Circus School, a Real Estate High-Wire Act New York, April 14

    The Muse Brooklyn, a circus studio and event space in Bushwick, has three years to find a new home that will allow its students and performers to soar. (Literally.)

  59. Superheroes Couldn’t Save a Comic Book Clubhouse in Lower Manhattan New York, April 14

    Loved by Wall Streeters and scruffy comic book junkies alike, Chameleon Comics was a clubhouse in the Financial District.

  60. A Classic Queens Movie Palace Faces Its Final Curtain New York, April 14

    Once a theater of staggering beauty, the long-shuttered RKO Keith’s in Flushing may soon be demolished.

  61. An Irish Wake for the ‘Cheers’ of Park Slope New York, April 14

    The Old Carriage Inn was a celebrated Brooklyn dive, with a rowdy karaoke night and a close-knit circle of regulars. “You’ll never see a more tight-knit group than this,” said one patron.

  62. Fire in Basement Crypt at St. John the Divine Forces Palm Sunday Worshipers Outside New York, April 14

    “Given the circumstances, everyone had a good time,” said Dean Clifton Daniel III, the cathedral’s leader.

  63. Fordham Student Dies After Fall From Bell Tower New York, April 14

    A 22-year-old senior died Sunday evening, hours after falling from a tower known to attract thrill-seeking students at the university’s Bronx campus.

  64. Fordham Student, Sydney Monfries, Dies After Fall From Campus Bell Tower New York, April 14

    Ms. Monfries, a 22-year-old senior, died Sunday evening, hours after falling from a tower known to attract thrill-seeking students at the university’s Bronx campus.

  65. The New York Post Inspires Boycott With 9/11 Photo and Ilhan Omar Quote New York, April 14

    The tabloid featured the burning World Trade Center towers and a partial quote from Representative Omar on a cover that protesters fear could incite violence against Muslims.

  66. Homes That Sold for Around $1,500,000 Real Estate, April 14

    Recent residential sales in New York City and the region.

  67. He Committed a $300 Million Fraud, but Left Prison Under Trump’s Justice Overhaul New York, April 13

    Hassan Nemazee, who once owned a $17.75 million Park Avenue duplex, had been serving a 12-year sentence. He benefited from a criminal justice bill signed by President Trump.

  68. 1 in 5 Bus Riders in New York City Evades the Fare, Far Worse Than Elsewhere New York, April 13

    The statistic stunned even the transit system’s leader, who said it was “wholly unacceptable” and at least double the rate of other cities around the world.

  69. The Subway Fare Rises on April 21. It Could Be Worse: One Year It Doubled. New York, April 12

    When the New York City subway started in 1904 the fare was a nickel. And it stayed that way for nearly half a century, until 1948 when it went up to a dime.

  70. Who is ‘Fnu Lnu’? New York, April 12

    Friday: When suspects are charged but their identity is unknown, they are often listed in court records as “Fnu Lnu.”

  71. How the Author of ‘Genius Foods’ Spends His Sundays New York, April 12

    Max Lugavere starts every day with a glass of water and ends it with putting on his blue blockers. In between, he forces himself to work on his book, and he hangs out with his brothers, who live in the same building.

  72. She Was Forced to Marry in Bangladesh. In Brooklyn, She Made Her Escape. New York, April 12

    For Muslim immigrants desperate to flee their abusers, there are almost no safe options. A community in Brooklyn organized to change that.

  73. Personal Chefs for Everyone: Bespoke House Calls in the Digital Age New York, April 12

    Once the province of the ultra rich, employing an array of personal helpers has begun to filter into everyday life for many New Yorkers of means.

  74. Why Are There Religious Exemptions for Vaccines? New York, April 12

    There is almost no religious basis to resist immunization. There is, however, an important voting bloc that would prefer not to vaccinate.

  75. A White Restaurateur Advertised ‘Clean’ Chinese Food. Chinese-Americans Had Something to Say About It. New York, April 12

    The uproar over a Chinese-American restaurant that was opened in Manhattan by two white restaurateurs has become the latest front in the debate over cultural appropriation.

  76. Marijuana Testing of Job Applicants Is Barred by City in Groundbreaking Measure New York, April 11

    The bill passed by the New York City Council was the latest in a series of steps to ease cannabis restrictions as efforts to legalize marijuana have stalled.

  77. 7 Classical Music Concerts to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, April 11

    Our guide to the city’s best classical music and opera happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  78. 12 Pop, Rock and Jazz Concerts to Check Out in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, April 11

    Our guide to pop and rock shows and the best of live jazz happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  79. 17 Art Exhibitions to View in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, April 11

    Our guide to new art shows and some that will be closing soon.

  80. 9 Things to Do With Your Kids in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, April 11

    Our guide to cultural events in New York City for children and teenagers happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  81. 5 Comedy Shows to Catch in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, April 11

    Our guide to stand-up, improv and variety shows happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  82. 7 Dance Performances to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend Arts, April 11

    Our guide to dance performances happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

  83. 4 Film Series to Catch in N.Y.C. This Weekend Movies, April 11

    Our guide to film series and special screenings.

  84. 13 Plays and Musicals to Go to in N.Y.C. This Weekend Theater, April 11

    Previews, openings and some last-chance picks.

  85. These Boots Were Made For a Long Run Interactive, April 11

    After 2,505 regular performances and 34 previews, the musical “Kinky Boots” high-stepped through its final Broadway performance.

  86. At Chicks Isan in Downtown Brooklyn, the Grilled Chicken Stands Above Food, April 11

    It took three months for the chef Ohm Suansilphong to pin down the recipe for kai yang, a classic Thai street food. Each bite is vivid and forthright.

  87. Thai Street Food, Vivid and Forthright Slideshow, April 11

    Chicks Isan, at DeKalb Market Hall in Downtown Brooklyn, is almost entirely devoted to pork, but the chicken truly shines.

  88. Homes for Sale in Brooklyn and Manhattan Real Estate, April 11

    This week’s properties are in Battery Park City, Chelsea and Kensington, Brooklyn.

  89. On the Market in New York City Slideshow, April 11

    This week’s properties are in Battery Park City, Chelsea and Kensington, Brooklyn.

  90. Measles Outbreak? Time for Disease Detectives to Get to Work New York, April 11

    Thursday: How health officials track the source of an epidemic and find solutions.

  91. He Killed His Wife for Her Fortune. Their Children Still Pleaded for Leniency. New York, April 10

    A judge sentenced Roderick Covlin to 25 years to life for the murder of his estranged wife. His children had asked for a lesser sentence.

  92. Mr. Netanyahu’s Next Test Opinion, April 10

    He ran an ugly, nationalist campaign. Can he be the leader of all of Israel?

  93. A Few More Black Students Are Offered Spots at Stuyvesant, Fanning Fresh Uproar New York, April 10

    A once-obscure program named Discovery has become an unexpected flash point in a local debate about specialized school admissions and the national fight over affirmative action.

  94. Overlooked No More: Rose Morgan, a Pioneer in Hairdressing and Harlem Obituaries, April 10

    From 1945 on, her Rose Meta House of Beauty drew black women around the country to the famed enclave of Sugar Hill and “the biggest Negro beauty parlor in the world.”

  95. Facing Nurses Strike, New York Hospitals Reach Landmark Deal on Staffing New York, April 10

    The agreement will lead to the hiring of more nurses and for the first time set minimum ratios of nurses to patients.

  96. New York City Has a Y2K-Like Problem, and It Doesn’t Want You to Know About It New York, April 10

    A city official admitted that technicians have been unable to get a major government network back up. “We’re working overtime to update the network.”

  97. Harlem School of the Arts Announces $9.5 Million Renovation Arts, April 10

    The extensive project, funded by the Herb Alpert Foundation, will replace the building’s facade and update its public gallery space.

  98. It’s a Crumbling Road to Despair. Can New York Fix the B.Q.E.? Arts, April 10

    There are a number of promising plans to repair the detested Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. But solving the problem will take an act of collective will.

  99. Hilma af Klint at the Guggenheim: One Work, Many Layers to Love Arts, April 10

    Roberta Smith revisits the groundbreaking exhibition through one standout work. You’ll want to see it in person before the show closes on April 23.

  100. At Hudson Yards, One Mall for the Rich, and One for Everyone Else Style, April 10

    The new development has high-end retail, art you can play with and not enough bathrooms.

  101. Measles Outbreak: The Public Health Emergency and the Crackdown in Brooklyn New York, April 10

    Wednesday: What you need to know about the outbreak, and efforts to contain it.

  102. At the Friars Club, When the Laughter Stopped Arts, April 10

    Financial ills and a federal investigation, just completed, have led to discord at the club, whose members have included entertainment industry legends.

  103. A Night at the Museum With Beer and Skulls New York, April 10

    For two researchers at the American Museum of Natural History, closing time means the start of an anthropological happy hour that has yielded 10 books and scores of scientific articles and papers.

  104. New York City Is Requiring Vaccinations Against Measles. Can Officials Do That? Health, April 9

    Mandatory vaccination is rare, but it has been done — and upheld by the courts. While judges have allowed health officials to fine citizens for refusing, forced vaccinations are highly unusual.

  105. 2 Women Were Killed on a Beach Vacation in 1973. A DNA Test Just Led to an Arrest. New York, April 9

    A grisly double-murder in Virginia was unsolved for nearly 46 years. Then DNA left at the scene led police to a Queens man in his 80s with a long criminal history.

  106. Bronx Teenager Who Became a Symbol for Ending Cash Bail Is Arrested on Slashing Charge New York, April 9

    Pedro Hernandez, 19, who has accused the police of framing him in the past, was charged with slashing a man during a robbery.

  107. Ed Westcott, a Singular Eye at the Dawn of the Atomic Age, Dies at 97 Obituaries, April 9

    He was the government’s official photographer at Oak Ridge, Tenn., a secret city where uranium was enriched for the bombs that fell on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

  108. ‘Monkey, Rat and Pig DNA’: How Misinformation Is Driving the Measles Outbreak Among Ultra-Orthodox Jews New York, April 9

    Handbooks distributed in some Jewish communities in New York, as well as messages on hotlines, contradict the scientific consensus that vaccines are safe and highly effective.

  109. What 8 People Wore to the Retail Mammoth That Is Hudson Yards Style, April 9

    “We don’t call it a mall. It’s a vertical urban retail center. Big difference.”

  110. Measles Spreads to 4 More States as 2019 Outbreak Grows U.S., April 9

    The C.D.C. reported 78 new cases of measles last week, including the first cases this year in Florida, Indiana, Massachusetts and Nevada. The total for 2019 is now at 465.

  111. New Measles Cases Reach Weekly High for 2019 U.S., April 9

    The C.D.C. reported 78 new cases of measles last week, including the first cases this year in Florida, Indiana, Massachusetts and Nevada. The total for 2019 is now at 465.

  112. With Haenyeo, a Trailblazing Korean Chef Turns to Seafood Food, April 9

    If New Yorkers think of Korean cuisine as comfort food, it’s partly thanks to Jenny Kwak.

  113. A Korean Restaurant That Makes Room for Beignets Slideshow, April 9

    Haenyeo, from the veteran chef Jenny Kwak, focuses on Korean seafood but makes some welcome detours from tradition.

  114. New York Declares Measles Emergency, Requiring Vaccinations in Parts of Brooklyn New York, April 9

    Mayor Bill de Blasio said that the city would require unvaccinated individuals living in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, to receive the measles vaccine.

  115. Recent Commercial Real Estate Transactions Real Estate, April 9

    Recent commercial real estate transactions in New York.

  116. N.Y. Lawmakers Are Going After Trump’s Taxes. Why? New York, April 9

    Tuesday: The battle over the president’s tax returns moves to Albany, and the rivalry between Harlem and Haarlem.

  117. Despite Prison and Torture, Shahidul Alam Refuses to Stay Quiet Lens, April 9

    Ahead of his court case, the Bangladeshi photojournalist and activist discussed democratizing photography and government censorship at the New York Portfolio Review.

  118. 7 Stories Up, a ‘Coping Stone’ Strikes Construction Worker, Killing Him New York, April 8

    A 51-year-old man was suspended on a scaffold as he did facade repair work on a brick building in Manhattan when he was hit in the head by a heavy stone slab.

  119. A Brooklyn Food Festival Celebrates Gowanus Food, April 8

    Taste of Gowanus, benefiting Seeds in the Middle, will give visitors a chance to sample the best of the neighborhood’s restaurants.

  120. A Car-Free New York? Opinion, April 8

    A reader explains why New York City is the ideal place to try the idea.

  121. How Gold’s Horseradish Came to Be a Passover Staple Food, April 8

    And the family’s personal recipe, so you can make it yourself.

  122. Why Is the Mayor Talking About Running for President? New York, April 8

    Monday: The Democratic field is crowded, but it seems like Bill de Blasio wants in.

  123. ‘I Really Just Wanted the Comfort of My Husband’s Being There’ New York, April 8

    Asking for flowers before having surgery, help hailing a cab on East Houston Street and more reader tales of New York City in this week’s Metropolitan Diary.

  124. The Pizza-and-Beer Train: New York City’s Hidden Railroad New York, April 7

    Most New Yorkers have not heard of the New York & Atlantic Railway, a freight line in the middle of New York City. But the line is growing, as rail freight emerges as a viable option.

  125. The Shed Opens: What Our Critics Think Arts, April 7

    Soundtrack of America, “Reich Richter Pärt” and work by Trisha Donnelly were on offer during the arts center’s inaugural weekend.

  126. Homes That Sold for Around $450,000 Real Estate, April 7

    Recent residential sales in New York City and the region.

  127. A Cuomo Insider Was a Big Money Lobbyist Who Drove a Porsche. Then Came a Stunning Fall. New York, April 5

    Todd Howe, a star witness in a Cuomo administration scandal, received no prison time after cooperating with prosecutors. He’s now a groundskeeper in Idaho.

  128. In New York, 2020 Democrats Offer a Range of Views on Racial Justice U.S., April 5

    The candidates addressed the annual conference of the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network, an essential event for Democrats seeking higher office.

  129. Artists as ‘Creative Problem-Solvers’ at City Agencies Arts, April 5

    Four artists will embed with city agencies to tackle social issues as part of the Public Artists in Residence program that began in 2015.

  130. If Prisons Don’t Work, What Will? Opinion, April 5

    The Democratic presidential candidates should look at what a growing number of prosecutors are doing to end mass incarceration.

  131. Prosecutors Sometimes Behave Badly. Now They May Be Held to Account. New York, April 5

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York approved landmark legislation creating a commission to investigate misconduct by prosecutors. District attorneys vowed to fight it in court.

  132. Spruced-Up Manhattan Townhouses Sell for Big Discounts Real Estate, April 5

    After lingering on the market, an Upper East Side mansion owned by Broadway producers and a Village carriage house once rented by a pop star finally close.

  133. Hudson Yards: A City Within a City Real Estate, April 5

    New York’s newest neighborhood drew inspiration from Battery Park City, but is filled with 21st-century twists.

  134. How Sara Haines, Television Host, Spends Her Sundays New York, April 5

    A career in morning television dovetails perfectly with parenting young children, at least when it comes to sleep schedules.

  135. Can Technology Stop the Duane Reade-ization of New York? New York, April 5

    Pharmaceutical delivery apps like Capsule offer an alternative to drugstores. Whether they could spell the end to commercial chains is up for debate.

  136. Is Bill de Blasio Running for President in 2020? Sure Looks Like It New York, April 5

    The mayor of New York is doing all the things politicians do before announcing a presidential run, including courting big and small donors.

  137. That Noise? The Rich Neighbors Digging a Basement Pool in Their $100 Million Brownstone New York, April 5

    The extremely loud and incredibly expensive renovations that have shattered a formerly quiet residential block in Manhattan.

  138. ‘Hamilton’ Set Designer Goes Whimsical, Using Sotheby’s Galleries as a Stage Arts, April 5

    David Korins is bringing some of Chatsworth House, the stately home from the movie “Pride and Prejudice,” to New York — for a show at Sotheby’s.

  139. From Disco to Techno, He’s Seen It on Sugar Hill’s Dance Floor Arts, April 5

    Eddie Freeman opened the Sugar Hill club in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, in 1979. Night life and the neighborhood have changed, but they still come to dance.

  140. A Boy Wandered Onto the Subway Tracks. A No. 5 Train Operator Sprang Into Action. New York, April 4

    The subway operator, Hopeton Kiffin, slowed his express train and gently coaxed the child off the tracks in Brooklyn and safely onto the train.

  141. The Shed Is Finally Open. Here’s What You Need to Know. Arts, April 4

    We offer a guide to navigating the new arts center set amid the towers of Hudson Yards.

  142. Michael Cohen’s Lawyers Say He Could Aid Trump Inquiries, if Only He Had More Time Out of Prison U.S., April 4

    The president’s former fixer has millions of documents and recordings that he thinks would interest Congress. But he is due to report to prison on May 6.

  143. N.Y. Attorney General Sues Manhattan Stem Cell Clinic, Citing Rogue Therapies Health, April 4

    Echoing F.D.A. concerns, the state’s top prosecutor accused Park Avenue Stem Cell of charging thousands of dollars for unproven, unregulated treatments.

  144. In a Playground for the 1 Percent, an Arts Center for the Rest of Us New York, April 4

    If Hudson Yards is the sin, is the Shed its penance?

  145. De Blasio Wouldn’t Say Who Was Hosting His Boston Fund-Raiser. We Found Out. New York, April 4

    A Boston-based construction company, trying to expand its New York business, is helping Mayor Bill de Blasio raise money for his national political ambitions.

  146. ‘Brick House’ Is Installed at the High Line Arts, April 4

    A bronze bust by the artist Simone Leigh is the first sculpture to be displayed in a new section of the elevated park.

  147. Body Found in Storage Unit May Be Missing Staten Island Teacher, Police Say New York, April 4

    Jeanine Cammarata, 37, a mother of three, has been missing for five days and was in the process of divorcing her husband.

  148. Homes for Sale in Brooklyn and Manhattan Real Estate, April 4

    This week’s properties are in Greenwich Village, SoHo, and Gowanus, Brooklyn.

  149. On the Market in New York City Slideshow, April 4

    This week’s properties are in Greenwich Village, SoHo, and Gowanus, Brooklyn.

  150. The City Gets a New News Source: The City New York, April 4

    Thursday: A nonprofit group aims to reinvigorate local reporting.