T/western-states

  1. How to Crack a Whip Magazine, Yesterday

    Start with an eight-footer. Wear a long-sleeve shirt.

  2. A Real Tube Carrying Dreams of 600-M.P.H. Transit Technology, Yesterday

    Virgin Hyperloop One is testing a system that would put passengers in pods hurtling through vacuum tubes. Other companies are moving ahead with similar plans.

  3. Saving the Bats, One Cave at a Time Science, Yesterday

    Biologists are searching caves and abandoned mines in the West, hoping to spare many species of the winged creatures from the devastating fungus, white-nose syndrome.

  4. Portland Mayor Calls for Investigation of Police Over Texts With Right-Wing Organizer U.S., February 17

    After hundreds of messages between the activist and a police lieutenant were made public, the mayor sought to “review the existence of bias” in the Portland Police Bureau.

  5. As Measles Outbreak Flares, Vaccination Rates Soar and Some Come Off the Fence U.S., February 16

    In a region with relatively high resistance to vaccines, a jump in measles cases has sent steady crowds to immunization clinics.

  6. Bill de Blasio: The Path Amazon Rejected Opinion, February 16

    It could have answered the concerns of citizens. Instead it bolted.

  7. A Mother Learns the Identity of Her Child’s Grandmother. A Sperm Bank Threatens to Sue. Health, February 16

    The results of a consumer genetic test identified the mother of the man whose donated sperm was used to conceive Danielle Teuscher’s daughter. Legal warnings soon followed.

  8. He’s 91 and the Post Office Threw Him a Party. For His Retirement. U.S., February 16

    Jack Lund, who has been on the job since 1949, drove his last mail run this month. When he first started hauling mail, he took over from the railroad.

  9. He’s 91 and the Post Office Threw Him a Party. For His Retirement. U.S., February 16

    Jack Lund, who has been on the job since 1949, drove his last mail run this month. When he first started hauling mail, he took over from the railroad.

  10. U.S. Looks to an Italian to Put Biathletes on the Olympic Podium Sports, February 15

    As the World Cup arrives in Utah, Armin Auchentaller tries to spread the gospel of biathlon to the United States, which has never won an Olympic medal in the sport.

  11. Burning Man, Seeking to Change ‘Convenience Culture,’ Boots Camp for Wealthy Business, February 15

    The chief executive said she had warned 12 camps and disinvited one from the annual event where attendees create music and art in the Nevada desert.

  12. Travis Kauffman Is No Chuck Norris, but He Did Kill a Mountain Lion U.S., February 14

    The runner said the attack by a young cat in North Colorado won’t keep him from returning to the trails. But in the future, he’ll do so with a friend.

  13. He’s No Chuck Norris, but He Did Kill a Mountain Lion U.S., February 14

    The runner said the attack by a young cat in North Colorado won’t keep him from returning to the trails. But in the future, he’ll do so with a friend.

  14. A Border Agent Detained Two Americans Speaking Spanish. Now They Have Sued. U.S., February 14

    The A.C.L.U. sued Customs and Border Protection after an agent told two women last year he was asking for their IDs because they spoke Spanish.

  15. Lauren Lovette to Be Artist in Residence at Vail Arts, February 14

    Ms. Lovette, a City Ballet principal, will dance, choreograph and teach. Also at the festival: new works by Hope Boykin, Pam Tanowitz and more.

  16. I Was a Nuclear Site Guard. My Colleagues Sexually Assaulted Me. Opinion, February 14

    The violence and lack of accountability I experienced at such a sensitive location put us all at risk.

  17. A Border Crash and the Blurry Line Between the U.S. and Mexico U.S., February 14

    Welcome to the first edition of Crossing the Border, a limited-run newsletter.

  18. Meeting My 84-Year-Old Father’s New Girlfriend Style, February 14

    I have arrived at a life phase in which my dad is crushing on a silver-haired grandmother, and I’m giddily becoming his girlfriend’s girlfriend.

  19. The Least Vegas Neighborhood in Vegas Travel, February 14

    The city’s Arts District offers theater without blue men or topless women, no poker tables, and the kind of indie food and bar scene not often seen on the Strip.

  20. Can a Progressive Case Be Made for Amazon HQ2? New York, February 13

    Low-income workers seem to want Amazon in New York more than elites do. Amazon should figure out how to give them what they really need.

  21. Mark Kelly to Run for Senate in Arizona U.S., February 12

    Mr. Kelly, the former astronaut who is married to Gabrielle Giffords, is challenging Republican Senator Martha McSally, who was appointed to the seat that had been left vacant by John McCain’s death.

  22. Snow in Hawaii, Flood Watches and Ice: Winter Weather Hits Much of the U.S. U.S., February 11

    The northern part of the country has gotten walloped with snow, while parts of the Southeast are seeing heavy rain and strong winds.

  23. Denver Teachers Once Hailed Performance-Based Pay. Now They’re on Strike Over It. U.S., February 11

    The districtwide strike is seen as a referendum on a compensation system that teachers say has delivered erratic bonuses while their base salaries stagnate.

  24. Snows Smack Seattle, Where Winter Is Supposed to Be About Rain U.S., February 10

    The Pacific Northwest’s usual seasonal storms are detouring through Canada first, delivering the snowiest February in 70 years to a city unaccustomed to getting more than an inch or two.

  25. Seattle Hit by Unusually Heavy Snowfall Moving Across Pacific Northwest U.S., February 9

    A rare confluence of winter storms slammed Seattle with as much snow in one day as it usually gets in an entire year.

  26. Arizona Nursing Center Where Incapacitated Woman Was Raped Will Now Stay Open U.S., February 8

    Hacienda HealthCare said Thursday it would close the center. But then the state expressed concern about the “health and safety” of moving out its patients.

  27. Rare Series of Snowstorms Bears Down on Seattle Area U.S., February 8

    Areas of Seattle received four to six inches of snow during a winter storm that started on Friday. Heavy snow was also hitting parts of California.

  28. Mountains Aren’t Just for Skiing Travel, February 8

    An increasing number of people are taking up snow hiking: wintertime trekking using snowshoes or special boots. Here’s what you need to know.

  29. Arizona Nursing Center Where Woman in Vegetative State Was Raped Will Close U.S., February 7

    Hacienda HealthCare said it was working to determine exactly how it would move its patients from the Phoenix facility elsewhere. State officials were dismayed.

  30. Tests for Oil in Arctic Refuge Won’t Happen This Winter, Officials Say Climate, February 7

    The decision to delay seismic testing in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska signals at least a temporary victory for groups that oppose oil exploration there.

  31. The Fight for Gender Equality in One of the Most Dangerous Sports on Earth Interactive, February 7

    These women want the right to compete in big-wave contests — and get paid as much as men do.

  32. Ex-Nurse Pleads Not Guilty to Sexually Assaulting Incapacitated Woman at Nursing Home U.S., February 6

    The Arizona governor has asked his attorney general to investigate Hacienda HealthCare, which runs the nursing home where the woman was a patient.

  33. $400,000 Homes in Ohio, Colorado and New York Real Estate, February 6

    An 1880 brick house in Columbus, an A-frame mountain home near Boulder and a one-bedroom cottage on an island in Pine Plains.

  34. What You Get for $400,000 Slideshow, February 6

    An 1880 brick house in Columbus, an A-frame mountain home near Boulder and a one-bedroom cottage on an island in Pine Plains.

  35. ‘A Match Into a Can of Gasoline’: Measles Outbreak Now an Emergency in Washington State U.S., February 6

    Measles, believed to be largely wiped out as a public health crisis two decades ago, is affecting dozens of children.

  36. Trump Plan to Stop Spread of H.I.V. Will Target ‘Hot Spot’ Areas U.S., February 5

    The plan to end transmission of the virus in the United States by 2030, outlined in the president’s State of the Union address, will focus on 48 counties where about half of new infections occur.

  37. Runner Kills Mountain Lion That Attacked Him, Authorities Say U.S., February 5

    The man, who had been running along a trail in Colorado, sustained serious but nonlife-threatening injuries.

  38. A Mountain Lion Attacked a Runner. He Choked It to Death and Escaped. U.S., February 5

    The man, who had been running along a trail in Colorado, sustained serious but non-life-threatening injuries.

  39. Food Trucks ‘Are No Longer a Novelty,’ but They Are Adapting Business, February 5

    Regulatory and market pressures are creating a tough operating environment for many vendors. Oversaturation and changing culinary tastes are also concerns.

  40. Letter of Recommendation: Color Blind Pal Magazine, February 5

    The free app doesn’t just help the color-impaired pick out clothes or decode maps — it lets everyone else see through their eyes.

  41. An Energy Wish List for Congress Opinion, February 5

    Here’s how lawmakers can accelerate the clean-energy economy.

  42. Where the Wild West Wears Its Heritage Interactive, February 5

    Every January, thousands of agricultural families come together for a 16-day celebration of Western heritage.

  43. Tech Is Splitting the U.S. Work Force in Two Business, February 4

    A small group of well-educated professionals enjoys rising wages, while most workers toil in low-wage jobs with few chances to advance.

  44. In Utah and Idaho, G.O.P. Looks to Curb Medicaid Expansions That Voters Approved U.S., February 4

    In Idaho and Utah, two conservative states, voters approved initiatives to expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Now G.O.P. lawmakers are looking to curb those expansions.

  45. For a Knife, Dagger, Sword, Machete or Zombie-Killer, Just Ask These Ladies Business, February 1

    Whitehead's Cutlery, in Butte, Mont., is 128 years old and will gladly sharpen scissors sold generations ago.

  46. A Hillbilly and a Survivalist Show the Way Out of Trump Country Opinion, February 1

    One common thread of J.D. Vance’s and Tara Westover’s memoirs is distrust of institutions. Yet it was institutions — the military in one case, college in the other — that saved them.

  47. New York Joins Movement to Abandon Use of Student Tests in Teacher Evaluations New York, February 1

    Under a bill approved in Albany, standardized tests could have almost no role in how teachers are evaluated — a sea change in New York’s approach.

  48. Howard Schultz Draws Protesters in His Hometown, Seattle U.S., January 31

    Mr. Schultz, the former chief executive of Starbucks, was greeted by about 40 protesters at an event after saying he would consider running for president as an independent.

  49. The Baumans, Sellers of Really, Really Rare Books Style, January 30

    Their shop is the thinking person’s place to go after hitting the jackpot in Las Vegas (or New York).

  50. Tough Times Along the Colorado River Opinion, January 30

    In the face of a prolonged drought, the federal government could step in and reduce water use in the Southwest.

  51. Apple Was Slow to Act on FaceTime Bug That Allows Spying on iPhones Technology, January 29

    A teenager in Arizona discovered the flaw, which allows eavesdropping, on Jan. 19, and his mother contacted Apple the next day. But the company was slow to reply.

  52. New Jersey Embraces Sports Gambling, and a Billion-Dollar Business Is Born Sports, January 29

    A Supreme Court ruling that expanded legal betting on sports has produced a gambling gold rush. Now bookmakers, media companies and tech entrepreneurs are rushing in to build out the industry.

  53. The Polar Vortex: Cold Hard Facts U.S., January 29

    You could get frostbite in as little as five minutes. It will be warmer in Antarctica than it is in Des Moines. It could feel like minus 65 in Minneapolis.

  54. The Polar Vortex: Hard Facts About Cold Weather U.S., January 29

    You could get frostbite in as little as five minutes. It will be warmer in Antarctica than it is in Des Moines. It could feel like minus 65 in Minneapolis.

  55. No ‘Clear Motivating Factor’ Inspired Las Vegas Gunman, F.B.I. Says U.S., January 29

    Stephen Paddock most likely chose a music festival for his rampage, which killed 58 people, because of the image of harming people who were having fun, an F.B.I. report said.

  56. It’s Getting Very, Very, Very Cold Outside. Read About Someplace Warm. Travel, January 29

    Looking for an escape route from the polar vortex? Here are a half-dozen possibilities that are guaranteed to be warmer than minus-14 degrees.

  57. The Trek Across the Border Veers Into More and More Remote Terrain U.S., January 29

    One outcome of the Trump administration’s ever-tightening border policies is migrants crossing in ever-more-remote, and more dangerous, places.

  58. How This Trump Policy Is Triggering Chaos at the Border Video, January 29

    The Trump administration’s hard-line stance on keeping migrants out is pushing asylum seekers to take remote and dangerous routes into the United States. And a wall might not be able to fix that.

  59. Ousted de Blasio Aide Was Fired Over Sexual Harassment Before New York, January 28

    Kevin O’Brien was fired in 2015 for sex harassment. Weeks later, he landed a job with Mayor de Blasio, eventually become acting chief of staff.

  60. Why Manohla Dargis Has Been Going to Sundance for Decades Reader Center, January 28

    Filmmakers travel to Park City, Utah, to show and sell their latest creations. Critics spend their days jumping from movie to movie, hoping for discovery and delight.

  61. Alaska Hunter Who Killed Cubs in Bear Den Gets 3 Months in Jail U.S., January 26

    A father-and-son hunting pair fatally shot a mother black bear and her newborn cubs in April. A camera used for wildlife research captured the whole thing.

  62. Border Wall Is Out of Sync With the Southwest’s Changing Politics U.S., January 25

    The wall might have helped Republicans in places like Montana and North Dakota, but all nine House members whose districts touch the southern border oppose it.

  63. A Nuclear Site Guard Accused Colleagues of Sexual Assault. Then She Was Fired. U.S., January 25

    The accusations underscored an entrenched culture of discrimination and retaliation that guards said flourished under two contractors at a highly classified Energy Department site in Nevada.

  64. Venezuelans Living in America Watch Crisis Back Home With Hope and Caution U.S., January 24

    The United States is home to more than 300,000 immigrants from Venezuela, a number that has soared in recent years. Many are seeking asylum.

  65. Dark-Sky Tourism: Under the Idaho Sky, a Sense of Belonging Business, January 24

    For a transcendant trip, head away from light pollution and crane your neck towards the stars.

  66. Nurse Charged With Sexual Assault of Woman in Vegetative State Who Gave Birth, Police Say U.S., January 23

    The Phoenix Police Department said that DNA taken from Nathan Sutherland, 36, a nurse at Hacienda HealthCare, matched that of a boy who was born in December.

  67. Nurse Charged With Sexual Assault of Woman in Vegetative State Who Gave Birth U.S., January 23

    The Phoenix Police Department said that DNA taken from Nathan Sutherland, 36, a nurse at Hacienda HealthCare, matched that of a boy who was born in December.

  68. Arrest of Immigrant Suspected in 4 Nevada Killings Draws Trump’s Attention U.S., January 22

    Wilbur Martinez-Guzman is believed to be in the United States illegally, the authorities said. They say he is responsible for four homicides in nine days.

  69. Big Change in Little Cottonwood Canyon Travel, January 22

    Alta, the famed Utah ski resort, has long been known for resisting alteration. Now, its first luxury lodge is set to open, and not everyone is happy.

  70. Roe v. Wade Is at Risk. Here’s How to Prepare. Opinion, January 21

    Abortion rights are under threat from the Supreme Court. But states can take critical actions.