T/mid-atlantic

  1. Ransomware Attacks Are Testing Resolve of Cities Across America U.S., August 22

    As hackers lock up networks that power police forces and utilities, municipalities must operate with hobbled computer systems, and decide whether to pay ransoms.

  2. Richard Ross, Philadelphia’s Police Commissioner, Resigns U.S., August 20

    The commissioner had not acted quickly enough after sexual harassment reforms last summer, the mayor said.

  3. In Pittsburgh, a Bookstore Where ‘Freewheeling Curiosity’ Reigns Books, August 18

    At a shop that at times functioned as a sanctuary after the Tree of Life shooting, the owner sees his job as “a moral obligation.”

  4. Trump’s Pittsburgh Speech Was a Paying Gig for the Audience U.S., August 17

    Union workers were told attendance wasn’t mandatory, but if they didn’t come, they would lose some of their expected pay for the week.

  5. A Gentler Way to Gentrify? Real Estate, August 16

    Gentrifier, interloper, developer: A new breed of builders is attempting to reclaim the “D” word and make development a little kinder and friendlier.

  6. Developer, and Other Dirty Words Slideshow, August 16

    A growing number of development companies are trying to shake the image of developers as interlopers and soften the blow of gentrification.

  7. How a Shooting Unnerved Philadelphia: ‘Our Collective Hearts Were in Our Throats’ U.S., August 15

    A frightening shooting that began with Philadelphia police trying to serve a narcotics warrant turned into a dramatic eight-hour standoff.

  8. My Bill Viola Video Marathon Arts, August 15

    From sunrise to sundown, a Philadelphia visit rediscovers the artist’s challenging contributions to installation art.

  9. When Cities Try to Limit Guns, State Laws Bar the Way U.S., August 15

    “Our officers need help, they need help with gun control,” Philadelphia’s mayor said after six police officers were wounded by gunfire. But in most states, the issue is not up to urban leaders.

  10. Philadelphia Police Shooting: What We Know About the Standoff and the Suspect U.S., August 15

    A man surrendered early Thursday after a long, tense standoff with the police in which six officers were shot.

  11. Shots Ring Out During Police Standoff in Philadelphia Video, August 15

    Six police officers were shot and wounded after trying to serve a warrant. A suspect later surrendered.

  12. Philadelphia Shooting Suspect Surrenders After Standoff U.S., August 14

    Six officers were wounded after the police tried to serve a narcotics warrant at a North Philadelphia home.

  13. $1.3 Million Homes in Pennsylvania, California and Montana Real Estate, August 14

    A 1973 home near Scranton by the Apple store architect Peter Bohlin, a two-family house in Long Beach and an 1880 home in Bozeman.

  14. What You Get for $1.3 Million Slideshow, August 14

    A 1973 home near Scranton by the Apple store architect Peter Bohlin, a two-family house in Long Beach and an 1880 home in Bozeman.

  15. At Chemical Plant Under Construction, Trump Builds List of Grievances U.S., August 13

    Mr. Trump railed against China, President Obama, the lawsuits he’s facing, and, as always, his media coverage.

  16. Fortnite’s Bugha Targeted in ‘Swatting’ Hoax U.S., August 13

    A caller falsely reported to the authorities that he had shot his father and tied up his mother, according to the police. The authorities quickly cleared the incident, officials said.

  17. These 3 Cities Are Key for 2020 Democrats. They’re Not in Iowa. U.S., August 13

    Senator Cory Booker detoured from early-voting states to hold rallies this month in Detroit, Philadelphia and Milwaukee, where turnout will be essential to Democrats winning back key states in 2020.

  18. Bill Cosby’s Appeal Begins with Sharp Questioning by Judges Arts, August 12

    Bill Cosby’s effort to overturn his conviction for sexual assault started Monday as his lawyers were pressed to explain the grounds for such an appeal.

  19. Bill Cosby’s Appeal Begins with Sharp Questioning by Judges Arts, August 12

    Bill Cosby’s effort to overturn his conviction for sexual assault started Monday as his lawyers were pressed to explain the grounds for such an appeal.

  20. A Giant Factory Rises to Make a Product Filling Up the World: Plastic Business, August 12

    Royal Dutch Shell’s plant will produce more than a million tons of plastic, in the form of tiny pellets. Many in the Pittsburgh area see it as an economic engine, but others worry about long-term harm.

  21. 5 Children Die in Fire at Day Care Center in Erie U.S., August 11

    The fire chief said that the house had only one smoke detector — in an attic — and that he “highly doubted” it was working.

  22. Summer in the City Is Hot, but Some Neighborhoods Suffer More Interactive, August 9

    New research shows that summer temperatures can vary as much as 20 degrees across different parts of a city, with poor and minority neighborhoods often bearing the brunt.

  23. Inmates’ Videos Shine a Light on Life in Prison Arts, August 8

    The videos, product of an animation class, will be projected onto Eastern State Penitentiary, a former prison in Philadelphia that is now a museum.

  24. ‘Red Flag’ Gun Laws Aren’t Airtight. But Officials Say They’ve Saved Lives. U.S., August 8

    State laws that let judges take guns away from troubled owners have been used thousands of times, though they work only when people report threatening behavior.

  25. Red Flag Laws Can Save Lives. Shootings in El Paso and Dayton May Expand Them. U.S., August 8

    State laws that let judges take guns away from troubled owners have been used thousands of times, though they work only when people report threatening behavior.

  26. Liberals for Inequality Opinion, August 8

    The meaning of a Seattle experiment.

  27. Lawsuit Says Former Boy Scouts Have Named 350 More Abusers U.S., August 7

    Lawyers who represent victims of child sexual abuse have been urging former scouts to come forward with claims before a possible bankruptcy filing by the Boy Scouts of America.

  28. Al Sharpton: Why I Went to Baltimore Opinion, August 6

    “We will focus on achieving real solutions for the minority community regardless of what hatred might be spewed from the White House,” the civil rights leader says.

  29. Deadly Germ Research Is Shut Down at Army Lab Over Safety Concerns Health, August 5

    Problems with disposal of dangerous materials led the government to suspend research at the military’s leading biodefense center.

  30. White Extremist Ideology Drives Many Deadly Shootings Interactive, August 4

    Active-shooter episodes in which the gunmen espoused white extremist beliefs have been among the deadliest in recent years.

  31. Navy Football Drops ‘Load the Clip’ Season Motto Sports, August 4

    The United States Naval Academy’s football team replaced the slogan out of respect for the victims of The Capital Gazette shooting.

  32. What These Student Debaters Learned From the 2020 Democratic Debates U.S., August 4

    For those who recently attended a debate camp, the Democratic debates were not a chance to undercut rivals or wring donations but something else: a lesson plan.

  33. ‘Too Bad,’ President Trump Says of Attempted Break-In at Elijah Cummings’s Baltimore Home U.S., August 2

    The 68-year-old congressman said he yelled to scare the intruder away after his security system warned him of the burglary at his West Baltimore home.

  34. ‘Too Bad,’ Trump Says of Attempted Break-In at Cummings’s Home U.S., August 2

    The 68-year-old congressman said he yelled to scare the intruder away after his security system warned him of the burglary at his West Baltimore home.

  35. Much Ado About a Little More Housing Opinion, August 1

    A ruckus over a rich suburb’s allowing a few more apartments shows how hard it can be to provide affordable housing.

  36. On the Border Wall, the Supreme Court Caves to Trump Opinion, August 1

    Increasingly, the court risks becoming identified as the president’s lap dog.

  37. An Art Museum in Your Hotel Lobby Travel, August 1

    Forget those predictable poster reprints. Some properties have begun to push the boundaries of what it means to be a hotel with great art.

  38. How Four Cities Can Predict Murder in America The Upshot, July 31

    There’s a workaround for researchers and policymakers faced with a big time lag in the release of national statistics.

  39. Democrats Can Win by Running Against Trump’s Racism Opinion, July 30

    It’s the right thing to do — both morally and electorally.

  40. Ahead of Debates, Pennsylvania Democrats Want Candidates to Stress Pragmatism U.S., July 30

    In a key swing state, Democrats looking at the presidential field were more likely to follow their head than their heart in whom to support.

  41. New Pints From Pennsylvania Food, July 29

    The new ice cream company Art Cream has ultrasmooth flavors and colorful packaging.

  42. Some Very Specific Things the President Could Do to Help Baltimore The Upshot, July 29

    And many things past administrations have done to hurt it.

  43. Trump vs. Baltimore: Stinging Words Opinion, July 29

    Readers react to President Trump’s racially charged criticism of certain members of Congress.

  44. Baltimore to Trump: You Lost Your Authority to Criticize U.S., July 29

    Baltimore residents know their city has deep, ugly problems. But they say President Trump’s race-baiting insults are not going to help Charm City.

  45. Trump Widens War on Black Critics While Embracing ‘Inner City Pastors’ U.S., July 29

    President Trump extended his attacks on critics of color with an early-morning Twitter blast calling Al Sharpton “a con man” and “a troublemaker.”

  46. Baltimore to Trump: Knocking Our City Is Our Job, Not Yours U.S., July 28

    When the president called Baltimore a “dangerous and filthy” place while attacking a Democratic congressman from the city, residents rallied to his defense, and their own.

  47. Trump Accuses Black Congressman and Allies of Being Racist, Deepening Feud U.S., July 28

    The president defended his criticism of the congressman and his “disgusting, rat and rodent infested” district, even as Democrats and the local newspaper fired back.